Tagged 'television'

'Like A (Super)Girl': 3 Ways CBS Could Do Some Serious Good This Fall (Video)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on June 20th, 2015 at 2:32 pm

Can a new TV show about a female superhero aspire to create positive messages for girls and women as well as (or better than) a certain viral video from a feminine products brand?
In just the last few weeks, Procter & Gamble's viral sensation "Like A Girl" won the GoodWorks Effie, which is designed to recognize marketers for effectively using their platforms for "purpose-driven' campaigns. That is to say, campaigns that accomplish some social good, beyond (just) promoting the brands behind them.
As most everyone in the world of marketing and advertising knows by now, the video, for P&G's Always brand, explores the meaning of the phrase "like a girl" - and how to redefine it. It's powerful stuff, and since its debut last summer, it has generated nearly 60 million views—and has been likened to some of the best work coming from Unilever's long-running "Campaign for Real Beauty."
Right around the same time, we also saw the release of a six-minute trailer for CBS-TV's new show "Supergirl" from Berlanti Productions—the team behind "The Flash," "Arrow," and the upcoming "Legends of Tomorrow" on CW.
Based on the character in DC comics, the series follows Kara Zor-El, the preteen cousin of baby Kal-El, as she... Read more

Farewell Q&A with NY Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 2): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 17th, 2015 at 10:03 am

Content marketing may get a lot of buzz these days - but it's as old as advertising itself.
In part two of my conversation with longtime New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliott, we continue to talk about how social media has paradoxically fueled growth in television viewership - especially for events like the Super Bowl.
But as part of this wide-ranging farewell Q&A with Elliott - who retired in December after nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times - we get into sponsorship advertising, as well as so-called content and video marketing.
Surprise: None of this is future-forward at all. Indeed, it's a return to the golden age of advertising. But while it sideswipes the problem of ad-skipping technologies and an ever-expanding universe of digital distractions, it comes with some considerable challenges of its own.
(Approx: 5:40)

Farewell Q&A with New York Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 1): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 5th, 2015 at 1:08 pm

The advertising world released a collective gasp when news hit that Stuart Elliott - the longtime advertising columnist for the New York Times - was accepting a buy-out package and would retire.
After nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times, not to mention stints at USA Today and Ad Age before that, Stuart and his column had become must-read for puissant, timely insights on Mad Ave.
And what a quarter century it was. From the early 1990s to today, the ad industry went from analog everything to digital domination; from "Married with Children" to "Modern Family;" and from bigger-is-better, to small is the new black.
"Who could or would have thought in the early ’90s that 20-odd years later the hegemony of television, for decades the most powerful ad medium, would be under siege, or at least, in question" Stuart wrote in his final column December 18.
"Ratings data, the currency of television, is growing problematic because viewership is more difficult to measure when people use mobile devices instead of TV sets; or watch shows online, as streaming video or as video-on-demand. And it is easier than ever for viewers to ignore or avoid traditional commercials; popular streaming services like Netflix are... Read more

The New Playing Field: Social TV, Marketers and Viewers

Posted by Dave Murrow on June 27th, 2013 at 2:28 pm

It's time for brand marketers to engage with and embrace interactive TV, Smart TV, Social TV — whatever you want to call it. The fundamental way we are watching content has changed and marketers have to shift their planning and strategies to meet new audience viewing habits.
Watching TV online and interacting via social networks is becoming the new at-home leisure activity among TV viewers. More than 145 million people in the U.S. will watch TV online by 2017, notes an eMarketer 2013 chart. That's a year-on-year rise of about 7 percent.
Instead of a passive viewing experience, today’s TV viewers are watching multiple screens, often at the same time. A Spring 2013 Nielsen study showed a relationship between the rise in those tweeting about a TV show and its TV ratings. The study showed that a show's premiere episode ratings improved by 1 percent with the 18-34 yr.-old demographic when there was a 8.5 percent uptick in tweets. There was also a similar percentage increase in 35-49 year-old viewer ratings with a comparable 14 percent increase in Twitter activity.
Today’s content viewing is growing into a social, active experience, where we share program links with friends and family on social networks. We’re checking... Read more

Fox Knows The Score

Posted by Matt Rosenberg on April 3rd, 2011 at 6:54 pm

Fox is a very self-aware company about the trouble the network TV business is in. First, the network reacted to Cablevision taking them off the air in a carriage fee dispute by blocking Cablevision ISP subscribers from Hulu, showing that they understand that the network is unnecessary if you want to watch Glee. Now Jim Gianopulos, the chairman of the 20th Century Fox movie studio is scolding cinemas for annoying customers by cluttering the pre-show screen with ads when the audience is used to being able to skip ads with their DVR.
The irony is that theater owners are doing the thing that TV networks used to be able to do quite well: monetize a captive audience. Mr. Gianopulos told the truth -- people don't like having their attention hijacked. Just because they are captive doesn't mean they will accept being hawked at.
The NY Times article that reported this implies that Mr. Gianopulos issued this statement as a partial explanation for the 20% Q1 decline in theatrical revenue. If people are so upset about ads screaming at them that they will avoid seeing a first run movie in its exclusive theatrical run, what does that say... Read more