Tagged 'social'

Farewell Q&A with NY Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 2): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 17th, 2015 at 10:03 am

Content marketing may get a lot of buzz these days - but it's as old as advertising itself.
In part two of my conversation with longtime New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliott, we continue to talk about how social media has paradoxically fueled growth in television viewership - especially for events like the Super Bowl.
But as part of this wide-ranging farewell Q&A with Elliott - who retired in December after nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times - we get into sponsorship advertising, as well as so-called content and video marketing.
Surprise: None of this is future-forward at all. Indeed, it's a return to the golden age of advertising. But while it sideswipes the problem of ad-skipping technologies and an ever-expanding universe of digital distractions, it comes with some considerable challenges of its own.
Photo: New York Times
Click Here to Download: Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOTT: WHAT I SAW AT THE REVOLUTION (PT 2) - THE RISE (& RISKS) OF CONTENT MARKETING
(Approx: 5:40)

Farewell Q&A with New York Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 1): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 5th, 2015 at 1:08 pm

The advertising world released a collective gasp when news hit that Stuart Elliott - the longtime advertising columnist for the New York Times - was accepting a buy-out package and would retire.
After nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times, not to mention stints at USA Today and Ad Age before that, Stuart and his column had become must-read for puissant, timely insights on Mad Ave.
And what a quarter century it was. From the early 1990s to today, the ad industry went from analog everything to digital domination; from "Married with Children" to "Modern Family;" and from bigger-is-better, to small is the new black.
"Who could or would have thought in the early ’90s that 20-odd years later the hegemony of television, for decades the most powerful ad medium, would be under siege, or at least, in question" Stuart wrote in his final column December 18.
"Ratings data, the currency of television, is growing problematic because viewership is more difficult to measure when people use mobile devices instead of TV sets; or watch shows online, as streaming video or as video-on-demand. And it is easier than ever for viewers to ignore or avoid traditional commercials; popular streaming services like Netflix are... Read more

2015 Mobile Marketing Predictions – from 2005 (Pt 2): Mobile Advertising

Posted by Rick Mathieson on December 15th, 2014 at 9:32 am

As longtime readers of my books, blog and posts here in iMedia will tell you, I’m not exactly bullish on mobile advertising.
At least not in its current model, which mostly takes the conventions from another medium (ad banners on the old-school Internet) and plops them into our used-to-be-shrinking-now-ever-expanding mobile phone screens.
Let me explain.
In 2005, it was clear to me that mobile advertising would have to be a game changer. But not just because it’s mobile, or the fact that you can target based on things like location.
As I wrote back then in my first book, BRANDING UNBOUND, the web banner-based ad model for mobile was something that had to be tried, and continues onto this day – if not for anything else than it’s a familiar framework, and it’s easy for agency folks to explain to clients.
Indeed, most marketers still don’t have a clue about mobile marketing. Just think of how the industry (and financial markets) herald Facebook’s success in mobile advertising.
I find it intriguing.  I have yet to see a Facebook banner ad that a.) I’ve clicked on, and b.) is anything different than the way I’d experience that same ad on the old school Internet.
Just because an ad... Read more

2015 Mobile Marketing Predictions – from 2005 (Pt 1)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on December 5th, 2014 at 11:07 pm

Let’s just say I had a head start on my 2015 mobile marketing predictions.
In 2005, my first book, BRANDING UNBOUND, hit bookshelves proclaiming a new era for marketing – one where the most measurable, personal and direct link to consumers ever created would change the world of marketing forever.
Written in 2003 and 2004, and published in June of ’05, I prognosticated about Apple Pay, iPad, Google Glass, Nest – and trends like marketing personalization, mixed reality social apps, augmented reality and more.
The book came out in June 2005 - two full years before the first iPhone was launched and heralded seismic changes to our relationship with technology.
Advertising that anticipates what you want and offers it before you even think you want it.

Services that let you shop for pizza, music, books and movies – anywhere, anytime.

Offers sent to you in-store, based on your age, gender, location, stated preferences and past purchase history—and even what merchandise you’re holding in your hands,  in real time.

Mobile, social platforms that let you do everything from get your gossip on to facilitating real-world meet ups between “crushes” who happen to be within 10 blocks of each others' physical location.

Stores... Read more

Innovation is a Passionate Accident

Posted by Shawn Fenton on November 25th, 2014 at 2:54 pm

Innovation is where passion meets opportunity. It's something you can’t plan for but you can prepare for.