Tagged 'online advertising'

Choice Impressions: The Diamond in the Rough

Posted by Bill Guild on September 3rd, 2014 at 12:01 pm

How advertisers use them and what publisher may do about them.
Back in June, I had the privilege of sitting on Joanna O’Connell’s panel at the Cynopsis Digital Big Monetization Summit in New York.  A lively conversation ensued which revealed some of the friction between publishers and advertisers. On the one hand, publishers are represented by supply-side partners that are working to sell blocks of inventory at favorably negotiated prices. Advertisers, on the other hand, are represented by demand-side partners trying their best to cherry-pick impressions and acquire them at rock bottom prices.  My post-conference thoughts reflected on the difference between the premium impressions we have become accustomed to and the new choice impressions.
Premium impressions come from premium publishers.  They are, in fact, defined by the publisher that generates them. Choice impressions, in contrast, occur naturally and can be found anywhere.
Choice impressions are those where the confluence of audience, content, and creative conspire to produce advertiser value.

The impression is choice (as in the preferred cut of meat, or the best seats in the house), because it represents a highly qualified consumer who is currently engaged with content that is relevant to the brand’s message in the creative.  Having caught the right... Read more

9 Email Marketing Rules You Have to Implement Today

Posted by Courtney Wiley on July 25th, 2014 at 4:36 pm

As a modern marketer, email is at the heart of your online marketing efforts . . . so it's important to take the time to make sure that every aspect of your strategy is optimized. That's why I've developed a list of nine rules over the years that have proven themselves worthy across entrepreneurial startups, SMBs, and global enterprise organizations. (Just be sure to test these guidelines to determine which work best for your target audience.)
1. ALWAYS take into account local time when sending emails. The best times to send are 9:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m., and 4:00 p.m.
2. NEVER be verbose in email body copy. Keep your text to 145 words or less.
3. ALWAYS use the "curve" method when writing an email subject line: Play on curiosity, urgency, relevance, value, and emotion.
4. ALWAYS keep your email subject lines to 50 characters or less.
5. NEVER send more than one email to your recipients per day.
6. ALWAYS use a good aesthetic mix of images and text in your design. A good rule of thumb is one image for every 15 lines of copy.
7. NEVER cheat and use "FW:" to imply that the email has come from a trusted source.
8. NEVER put the unsubscribe button... Read more

10 Keys to Measurable Marketing Copy Success

Posted by Grant Johnson on July 9th, 2014 at 2:20 pm

Direct or measurable marketing is copy-driven. Way too many marketers change up a package or banner ad or landing page/website design first. Instead, they would be better served to tweak their copy. It will provide a bigger bang for the dollars spent, as these changes more often than not lead to sustainable ROI growth.
From my experience, here is a 10 item check list of questions to consider when you do your next copy rewrite:
1.)    Is Simpler better? Your copy should have 80% or more words that are five letters long or less. Smaller words make you, the marketer, appear smarter. If you have a complex product or service, you will be better served by simplifying your marketing prose.
2.) What grade-level should you write to? A 6th grade level seems to be the level from most campaigns I have done. This will force you to make your material easier to understand, but not so basic you offend people.
3.) How long should your sentences be? 15-20 words on average is optimal. However, I prefer to start with a quick 10 word or less sentence, focusing on a single benefit, whenever possible. One that captures the reader and makes them want to... Read more

Help Advertisers Find Audiences with Viewable Impressions

Posted by Roy de Souza on July 8th, 2014 at 9:26 am

Advertising has always been a cyclical and tenuous business. The venerable department store magnate John Wanamaker, whom no one even remembers any longer, once said “I know half my advertising is wasted; I just don’t know which half.”  If there’s a blip in the market, advertising is always the first thing to go, and that’s why Madison Avenue is so competitive and littered with Type-A corpses.
What is different now from in Wanamaker’s time is the number of businesses  based on advertising as a business model, as though it can support an infinite number of publishers. Even Google had to diversify. They can’t ALL continue to exist. Before  the internet, we had far fewer publishers than we have now. Some just had to go. Like job opportunities in a downturn, advertising never goes away entirely, but it does shrink.
Advertisers are now choosing among a larger group of publishers, some of whom represent completely new concepts of content and new demographics. So what happens? If you’re a legacy publisher with advertising as a business model, one thing you can do is lower your rates, cut your burn.  Even the New York Times has had to do all this and more.   But there’s something else you can do: you can help advertisers find their... Read more

Should You Outsource Your Ad Ops?

Posted by Roy de Souza on June 16th, 2014 at 8:08 am

Advertising Operations (aka Ad Ops) is critical to both the buy- and sell-side of digital media. A well-oiled Ad Ops team with technical expertise and the ability to turn  campaigns around quickly helps an organization run seamless operations and in turn achieve revenue goals.
Over the years, Ad Operations has evolved from being a highly technical task to a more process-driven activity requiring diligence and meticulousness as its most important skills. This of course has been driven by the simplified UI’s and workflows of most of the Ad Servers used today (barring a few, I should say).
Managing an Ad Ops team however, presents its  own challenges. From ever-increasing costs to employee retention, many issues grab the time and attention of upper management. Some of these challenges though can be mitigated by outsourcing your Ad Operations activities.
Although there are many advantages to outsourcing Ad Ops, there are a few important ones. The most important of these is cost effectiveness; it’s usually less expensive to outsource. Based on the Ad Monsters Salary survey for 2013, an organization can save up to 50% in salaries when it outsources a regular Ad Trafficker position. Savings can be greater if you include the “burden” — almost a third more than the salary for benefits, management... Read more