Tagged 'marketing'

Q&A: Chris Lindland, CEO of Betabrand on Newsjacking HP T-Gate (Video)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on July 31st, 2015 at 10:51 am

Betabrand knows how to break news. Or at least break into it.
The San Francisco-based online clothing company has a history of newsjacking—it made a name for itself when Mark Zuckerberg met with Wall Street bankers in (what else) a hoodie. Zuckerberg's sister Randi stumbled upon Betabrand's $148 Executive Hoodie (think worsted wool) and inventories instantly sold out.
Fast forward to this week, and the small brand has made an art of fast-turn content marketing that this week included a one-take video capitalizing on reports that Silicon Valley legend HP was banning t-shirts in its engineering department to recruit some engineers of its own.
That was Monday. On Tuesday I told CEO Chris Lindland that he had a hit on his hands. By Wednesday Adweek and FastCompany had covered the video. And whether responding to it or simply the news reports, HP Human Resources felt the need to post its own video reassuring employees that the ban was just an unfounded rumor.
I talked with Chris again this morning about his amazing week—and what is says about effective content marketing in general—and powerhouse newsjacking in particular.
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO: Q&A: Chris Lindland, CEO of Betabrand on Newsjacking HP T-Gate
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Which social media networks do hospitals post on most?

Posted by Doug Schumacher on July 15th, 2015 at 12:05 pm

Where brands posts says a lot about how much they value a given social media channel, and how much effort they’re willing to put into it. With that said, let’s take a look at the global posting leaderboard for children’s hospitals to see which networks they’re putting their time and effort into. Check out the Posts Leaderboard, below.
First, note the average of all these brands in the gray row. Twitter is clearly the network getting the most activity. Facebook is a solid second, and YouTube and Google Plus are both at the lower end of the spectrum, likely due to video being a more complex format to publish in, and Google Plus being a network brands still aren’t clear on the value of.
You can also see that while the posting volume varies from brand to brand, most of them follow the same order of Twitter first and Facebook second.

Posting is an interesting look at the activity, although it’s certainly not the end of the story. A logical next metric would be to see what levels of engagement the brands are getting from their content on each network.
So below are the engagement totals for each brand, by network. These are the total public... Read more

Chart: Most-shared luxury fashion topics on Facebook

Posted by Doug Schumacher on July 14th, 2015 at 9:05 am

Let’s take a look at the most highly-shared topics on Facebook for luxury fashion brands. Below, in the Subject Explorer, you can see the most shared topics for the month of June. I’ve tweaked the sliders a bit to see topics with at least 4 posts during the month, to make it less likely to be driven by a single post. And I’ve also set the minimum number of pages to 2, to get topics that are used across more than one brand.

You can see from the engagement level legend on the right that the high sharing rates in these posts also led to high engagement rates, given the number of dark red topics in our cloud. Looking at the specific terms, I’m particularly interested in the hashtag #mfw, as hashtags are typically a more unified theme or topic.
So let’s take a look at that hashtag to see what it’s about and which brands are using it.
Below is the Subject Analyzer for #mfw. You can deduce from the Top Related Terms chart that this is about Milan Fashion Week, as well as see various metrics on how each brand utilized that hashtag. Twenty-two posts in a few days is pretty high... Read more

Why so few World Cup victory posts on Facebook from US Women’s soccer sponsors?

Posted by Doug Schumacher on July 8th, 2015 at 9:19 am

In an analysis of 12 of the 14 official sponsors of US Soccer, I found only 3 posted about the women’s World Cup victory on their Facebook pages (I used the Facebook pages featured on each sponsor’s website listed on the sponsor page).  It struck me as odd that more brands weren’t joining the rest of the country in a little flag-waving over the championship. Really, what are they paying those sponsorship dollars for?
Below, in the Subject Analyzer, is a breakout of all 6 posts from the sponsors for the week of July 1 – 7, the week surrounding the World Cup game. You can see the specific terms searched for in the posts — “soccer”, “cup” and “uswnt”. The Posts chart shows the post are, not surprisingly, all photos. And the Engagements chart shows a good amount of sharing. So the topic seems to be of interest to the fans of those brands.

To further demonstrate how little mentioning there was of the USWNT victory, here are the topics posted on during that week by the sponsors. Yes, it was July 4th, and that’s a big deal for US brands. But Sharkweek over a World Cup championship?

Here are the various brands involved in this analysis. You can see a... Read more

Tostitos’ #anyexcusetoparty campaign analyzed on Facebook

Posted by Doug Schumacher on June 30th, 2015 at 9:05 am

Below is a leaderboard showing post and page activity for a number of the leading brands in the “dips” category. You can see the brands involved in this analysis, their fan base, growth rate, posting volume, etc.

In the chart below, you can see the most impacting topics in this category for the month of May.

Campaigns are often particularly good to examine, and especially highly-engaging ones. So the #anyexcusetoparty hashtag stands out as one to explore. Below is an analysis of that campaign’s activity on Facebook. Not heavy posting volume, but except for the first week, a regular schedule of posting every Thursday. You can also see they were all photo posts.

So what are these highly engaging posts? Below, you can see the style and format. Finding any excuse for chips and dip, with the loose script and casual party scenes adding to the supposed spontaneity.