Tagged 'marketing'

Startup Marketing Conference: Running A Marketing Organization That Supports Sales At All Levels

Posted by Kent Lewis on October 23rd, 2014 at 4:51 pm

For the mid-afternoon expert panel session at Startup Marketing Conference, an esteemed group of marketers and technologists discussed how to manage a marketing organization that supports sales at all sizes of business. Panelists included:

Adam Metz, VP BD, Pandadoc (host)
Mike Berger, Director of Product Marketing @ Marketo (SMB)
Mikita Mikado, CEO, Quote Roller (startups)
Martyn Crew, Founder and CEO, Bootstrap Marketing (enterprise)

The first question related to each of the panelists first marketing objective and how they each nailed it. Mikado’s objective was signups and it took him three months to gain 4,000 users, but very few converted to paying customers. Crew’s enterprise background meant marketing supported sales and the key objective was deal flow. Berger’s primary objectives related to fueling the demand generation engine, putting in a system of measurement that correlated with business outcomes and creating a compelling story that differentiated the brand (messaging and positioning).
The next question: In the last five years, what was the single worst investment you made in marketing? Crew stepped up and led with general feedback from clients who were asked that question and the answer was universally “feel good” marketing campaigns (colors, fonts, and other fun stuff). Mikado’s thought was on hiring talent you don’t need... Read more

Report: Social Media Benchmarks for 5 Industries

Posted by Doug Schumacher on October 15th, 2014 at 12:07 pm

One of the more popular reports we publish are benchmarking reports. As every industry is different, it’s interesting to see how KPIs like fan counts and engagement rates track across different industries, as well as across brands within the same industry.
This report takes a look at 5 major industries: Snack Foods, Fashion Retail, Pet Food, Luxury Auto and QSR Restaurants, assessing each on two major social media KPIs. Fan count, and engagement rate. The networks they are analyzed on include Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Google Plus and Pinterest.
Key Takeaways

Facebook is still the dominant network in each industry. There’s only one industry, Luxury Autos, in which Facebook has less than 80% of the total average community size.

Instagram leads significantly in engagement rate in every industry profiled.

Google Plus is showing both strong community size, and even more surprisingly, high engagement rates, in several of the industries.

Executive Recruiting: The Importance of Educating Marketing Candidates

Posted by Willie Pena on September 18th, 2014 at 9:12 am

If you currently hold a high-level marketing position, you’ve probably gone through your fair share of job interviews over the years. However, you may not be as well-versed in the process of executive recruiting, especially if you’ve been with the same company for an extended period of time. Although there are some similarities between the executive hiring process and hiring for an entry- or mid-level position, there are also some key differences that you need to know. As a candidate, understanding how the executive recruiting process works can help you advance your career with the right company.
At Executive Level, Search Firms Will Come to You
When you first started your career, you may have had to read through job boards or attend networking events in the hopes of landing an interview. However, when you’re at the executive level, you can expect recruiting firms to reach out to you. These search firms may find you in a number of ways; much of the time, the firm will do a lot of work with a specific industry and may already know you through their networking efforts. The firm may also use an in-house team of researchers and other resources available to them to... Read more

Choice Impressions: The Diamond in the Rough

Posted by Bill Guild on September 3rd, 2014 at 12:01 pm

How advertisers use them and what publisher may do about them.
Back in June, I had the privilege of sitting on Joanna O’Connell’s panel at the Cynopsis Digital Big Monetization Summit in New York.  A lively conversation ensued which revealed some of the friction between publishers and advertisers. On the one hand, publishers are represented by supply-side partners that are working to sell blocks of inventory at favorably negotiated prices. Advertisers, on the other hand, are represented by demand-side partners trying their best to cherry-pick impressions and acquire them at rock bottom prices.  My post-conference thoughts reflected on the difference between the premium impressions we have become accustomed to and the new choice impressions.
Premium impressions come from premium publishers.  They are, in fact, defined by the publisher that generates them. Choice impressions, in contrast, occur naturally and can be found anywhere.
Choice impressions are those where the confluence of audience, content, and creative conspire to produce advertiser value.

The impression is choice (as in the preferred cut of meat, or the best seats in the house), because it represents a highly qualified consumer who is currently engaged with content that is relevant to the brand’s message in the creative.  Having caught the right... Read more

The Value of Sales Experience in Marketing

Posted by Benjamin Taylor on August 20th, 2014 at 9:28 am

Simple but important skills like preventing an audio meltdown on a call, knowing how to make strangers comfortable, when to call and when to e-mail, helping your target influencers by using your own network to accrue favors, and building/maintaining that network of influencers for the future, are all things that a good sales representative will know how to do, and that a regular marketer will not.