Tagged 'innovation'

5 Ways to Improve Customer Experience in 5 Minutes A Day

Posted by Jeannie Walters on July 1st, 2014 at 9:30 am

We're officially halfway through 2014, and now is actually a great time to review what you have done to improve the experience you create for your customers, and what you would like to set in motion for 2015. But while you're thinking about bigger things you should PLAN on doing, let’s talk about what you can do right now to start improving your customer experience.
Here's how you can make great strides in just minutes a day:
1. Dedicate some time to focusing only on customers.
Whenever you get a chance, ignore the noise coming from your boss, the shareholders or the press. Take a few moments to think about what your customers actually need. If your boss wants you to develop a mobile app because your competitors already have them, stop and ask yourself if this will solve any real problems your customers have. When the survey responses are telling you the billing process is disjointed or impersonal, will a mobile app really make them any happier? In the second half of the year, most of us have limited or no resources for starting a new initiative. Make some quick notes about what the real challenges are and prioritize in favor of your... Read more

The Jetsons weren't that far-fetched after all

Posted by Sean Cheyney on June 25th, 2014 at 11:10 am

For the past handful of years, technology and innovation have been changing the way in which people shop.
According to Olga Patel from Mattel during a session at the iMedia Commerce Summit, changes that we have already been seeing impact shopping in the areas of Experience and Convenience.
When it comes to the experience, innovation doesn’t necessarily need to mean technology advancements. For example, anyone who has a young daughter has been exposed to the experience driven brand, American Girl. When visiting the stores, girls are encouraged to bring their American Girl dolls for dining at the Café, where the dolls are given their own high chair at the table. Additional experiences such as girls taking their dolls to the American Girl hair salon and numerous special events truly draw in young girls to the overall experience and draw big dollars right out of the wallets of parents.
Additionally, technology innovations that have been positively impacting both the experience and convenience of shopping are on the brink of taking us to the world many of us never imaged while watching the Jetsons growing up.
Already, we have seen technology advancements encroaching on science fiction being used by companies like Lowe’s with their Holoroom, giving... Read more

Put your money (and time) where the fans are: From social media innovation to practice

Posted by Yuna Park on June 11th, 2013 at 12:13 pm

This post is the last in a three-part series with practical tips for marketers to pursue social and digital innovation. Read the first post, on maximizing your personal social media usage, here and the second post, on how to uncover the coolest new apps and toys, here.
You have the tools at your avail and you’re learning continuously about the social and digital landscape. But how do you take everything you’ve learned and put it into practice for your brand?

1. Experiment during existing campaigns. Don’t get overwhelmed by a new platform or technology. Think of how it can help add to your existing campaigns. Taco Bell did an excellent job with this, leveraging the growth of Snapchat to share the news that their Beefy Crunchy Burrito was returning to the menu. To do so, Taco Bell encouraged its existing social fans to add “tacobell” as a friend on Snapchat in order to be looped into an upcoming secret announcement. The Snapchat of the Beefy Crunchy Burrito was sent, generating a wealth of noise for the brand and the product launch, and then Taco Bell’s activity subsided on Snapchat. They were able to appropriately and successfully utilize a new platform for... Read more

2 Ways to Read Your Data

Posted by Greg Kihlström on June 11th, 2013 at 10:50 am

Edmund Wilson, the noted literary critic, once said, “No two people read the same book.” It could also be said that no two people will make the exact same analysis from a complex set of marketing data. There are a number of ways to read the numbers and a wealth of solutions for each problem or challenge they present.
This article describes two ways to look at your marketing data and two potential approaches based on what you find.
Optimization
The first scenario could have a number of first steps. Perhaps you’ve recently launched a new campaign, product or website. Or maybe you have happy shareholders or a board of directors that is pleased, but you now have access to some new insights or data.
When your numbers are good – but not quite great – and you know that some small changes or additional tactics could help, it’s time to optimize.
Optimization can take a number of forms. It could be reevaluating some of your vendors’ performance or adjusting your media mix. Perhaps it’s time to adjust the creative – again. It could even be optimizing the user experience to incorporate responsive design into your web platforms. As long as what you do... Read more

Why we need better memories if we're going to truly innovate

Posted by Greg Kihlström on May 8th, 2013 at 11:30 am

For all the real-time tracking, daily analytics and other data that we have at our disposal, there is one dimension that we need to keep in mind more than ever. In the context of these “short-term” examples, this other dimension can be referred to as “long-term” memory.
As they say, there is “nothing new under the sun.” We run into issues when we individually or collectively believe this to be untrue, as it leads us to present so-called new ideas or concepts when they simply aren’t unique or innovative. This could be either within an organization, or in society as a whole. It is our responsibility as strategists and marketers to cut through the superficial layers of style and determine what substantive trends are driving our work and our industry.
Take a technology example:
I suppose this started with the idea of a “guest book” on a website back in the early 90s. Remember message boards? You might also know them as “forums.” A few years later a revolutionary new technology was created called “weblogs” or now “blogs” as we commonly refer to them. Then came things like Twitter and Tumblr, which were treated as revolutionary new ideas. In reality, these are all... Read more