Tagged 'google'

Mobile Trumps Desktop and TV, People Trump Everything!

Posted by Denise Zimmerman on July 16th, 2015 at 2:38 pm

Mobile now trumps desktop and for the first time, Americans spent more time on average looking at their mobile devices than at a television screen. Over the past several years we have anticipated the rise of mobile.
It's coming this year.
Oops, no next year.
Wait, really, it’s coming.
And here we are.
The industry consensus is that we have now reached the tipping point for mobile. This is the year and it is explosive. The phone has arguably become an extension of us and made multi-screen viewing more commonplace. Nielsen says 84% of consumers use their mobile device as a second, supplementary screen to the TV.
It is not however, all about the device. It’s about people, changes in behavior, shifts in the customer journey and the technological advancements that enable us to reach and engage our customers anywhere, anytime and anyplace. The mobile consumer has moved front and center and must be prioritized in our practice, plans and efforts.
What does this mean for digital media and advertising? Mobile search ad spending will exceed desktop search ad spending for the first time in 2015. Mobile spend is projected to make up 72% of total digital ad spend in the US by 2019, according to... Read more

From Mobile Computing to Localized Marketing, Part II

Posted by Rob Reed on July 13th, 2015 at 12:06 pm

The localization of marketing leaves other forms of marketing in the past
"I skate to where the puck is going, not where it's been."
Gretzky's well-known quote is one of the most abused business clichés, but that's because (a) business people love sports analogies and (b) it so perfectly captures the essence of vision.

Vision is the ability to connect the dots of the past and project into the future with the precision of Gretzky skating to a puck. The vision for MomentFeed in 2010 was for a platform that could handle the marketing paradigm of 2015, a paradigm that would be defined by smartphones and mobile computing.
This was ultimately the vision for a new form of marketing...for localized marketing, as discussed in Part I of this series. In Part II, we'll review the landscape of digital marketing solutions (where the puck has been) and how localized marketing is a fundamentally different animal.
Antiquated Marketing Systems
Before exploring localized marketing more deeply, it's important to understand the current landscape of enterprise marketing solutions. The largest category of the past 10 years is social media management solutions (SMMS). These cover paid, earned, and owned media, and they provide a range of functions from publishing (CMS) and reputation management to customer service and business intelligence. I'll also talk about the local search and SEO spaces, which... Read more

How much do luxury fashion brands post in each social media network?

Posted by Doug Schumacher on June 8th, 2015 at 12:00 pm

If you want to understand how much brands value (and get value from) their various social media properties, one interesting benchmark is how much posting they put into each network. Especially relative to their closest competitors.
Of course there are various factors to consider, like the type of industry and the different content types and styles of different networks. But if brands truly value a given network, it’s most likely they’ll put in a respectable level of posting for their industry.
Let’s take a look at some of the leading brands in the luxury fashion space as an example, below.
Posting Volume for Each Network – Luxury Fashion Brands

The first thing you may have noticed in the above example is the broad range of posting volumes in each of the different networks. It suggests considerably different approaches taken by the different brands. That’s great if you’re wanting to learn from the tactics of competitors, as it should provide a wide range of approaches to each network.
As noted above, there are also significant differences in the networks. It would be surprising to see a brand posting more on YouTube than on Twitter, given the different formats of each. In luxury fashion, we can see Twitter... Read more

Google’s Panda Update: Why Great Content Matters

Posted by Gordon Plutsky on January 13th, 2015 at 1:08 pm

One of the primary purposes of content marketing is to generate qualified inbound, organic traffic from search engines. It’s the most basic element of a content marketing plan and what drives many marketers to become brand publishers. This task has gotten a bit more complex as Google continues to refine and update its Panda algorithm.  The purposes of these updates are to improve the user experience and search results for the consumer.
It is important to remember Google’s motivation in refining the process of which sites rise to the top of the rankings.  They make their considerable fortune from search engine ads (Adwords) and that depends on having customers searching hundreds of millions of times per year. If consumers were not getting quality search results they would go elsewhere and Google would lose their traffic.  Bottom line – Google’s allegiance is to the customer, not to companies like yours trying to rise up the search rankings for unpaid organic traffic.
The purpose of Panda is to encourage site owners to provide quality content and user experience to customers that help them make more informed buying decisions.  Panda rewards high quality content and punishes “light” and duplicate content.  Duplicate content is an issue for many SMBs who... Read more

Startup Marketing Conference: Storytelling Rules Marketers Need to Know

Posted by Kent Lewis on October 23rd, 2014 at 3:32 pm

At the Startup Marketing Conference, the early afternoon panel on social media and storytelling included the following experts:
Colleen Pettit, Digital Media Manager, DoubleClick (panel host)
Todd Wilms, VP Digital, Neustar
Olivia June Poole, Director of Community Development, RocketSpace
Brewster Stanislaw, CEO and Co-Founder Inside Social

The first question related to content being king and how important it is overall. Stanislaw guided startups to focus on who the content is being produced for and how it can best be distributed. Poole reminded everyone that storytelling is more difficult when you don’t have an existing users, so it is important to get the stories out there early. Wilms took a more jaded approach, and cautioned against content for content’s sake. Take the time to find your voice before ramping up content.
The second question related to finding your story as a startup. Poole suggested interviewing early adopters to find out why they appreciate the product. Sans users, focus on education and thought leadership to start to build your story.
The third question addressed the conundrum of outsourcing content development to agencies or others vs. building it in-house. Poole indicated that agency partners are a luxury, so use them wisely (learn from them then do it on your own).... Read more