Tagged 'digital advertising'

What Social Video Means to the Online Video Space

Posted by Anupam Gupta on August 8th, 2013 at 9:08 am

Business Insider’s latest BI Intelligence report examined the impact of social video on the digital distribution and consumption of video content. BI defines social video as “video that is influenced — in any part of the pipeline, from production to distribution — by social media.”
It’s no surprise that social media has become entwined with our video consumption habits, considering it also informs most of our other behaviors from shopping to parenting to interacting with friends and family. What is interesting, however, is how it is actually changing video content itself.
Social media audiences aren’t known for their attention spans, so new video content is being condensed to suit their viewing habits. BI calls it “snacking” on video. Shorter videos are more conducive to sharing, and some of the newer social mobile video apps like Instagram, Vine and Tout limit video duration to 15 seconds or less. The average duration of an online video was 5.6 minutes in April 2013, compared to 6.6 minutes one year ago, according to comScore.
In the last five years, every digital shop has gotten the request from a client: “make us a viral video.” Going viral is the end all, be all of video advertising, because it... Read more

The End of Intuition? A Discussion with David Edelman

Posted by Penry Price on May 14th, 2013 at 5:08 am

Marketers need intuition more than ever before. The masses of data that they can analyze, and the tools available, can certainly find interesting patterns on their own, but that is just one ingredient in the value creation recipe. Since there’s so much data out there, good intuition (and by that, I’m including judgment as well) is necessary to set priorities for what to look for, what matters to the customer, what the competitive landscape looks like and how behaviors are changing over time.

The End of Intuition: A Discussion with Paul Pellman

Posted by Penry Price on March 13th, 2013 at 6:33 am

Advertisers have always trusted their guts when it comes to connecting with consumers. But, how do we really know that works? Enter data science. The numbers are out there to tell us if campaigns are truly effective, and it’s sparking a debate over the end of intuition.

Luxury Automakers Shifting Budgets Online

Posted by Tom O'Regan on February 28th, 2013 at 9:49 am

This past summer, Martini Media composed luxury brand research that looked closely at how brands were leveraging digital to connect with affluent consumers online. Based on recent demand from marketers in the auto industry, we extended our research to further examine brands in the automotive space. What we learned is that, by and large, automakers are following their consumers online. One could say – if one had a tendency to pun – that the automotive is driving the digital channel forward. And while luxury auto brands aren’t exactly leading the pack, they are keeping up quite nicely.
Agencies report that auto brands are moving into digital channels more quickly than other brands – and why not? The luxury auto story can be told elegantly online with rich media. As with TV, there’s an opportunity to roll HD video featuring beautiful images of the car in motion with atmospheric music, but rich media has the advantage of being interactive in addition to being very visual. Consumers can click to take a tour of the car, zoom in on specific features, even locate a vehicle in local inventory and make an appointment for a test drive at the dealership. Rich media was practically... Read more

Maximize Digital Advertising with the 20% Rule

Posted by Leslie Van Zee on February 19th, 2013 at 7:29 pm

These days, display advertising effectiveness data is accessible online. You can easily research brand data to distinguish between what is effective and what isn't. This isn't rocket science; it is verifiable and tangible knowledge of what consumers respond to. Most digital advertising hosts run simple A/B tests to identify specific elements that are successful. Using both a test group and a control group, advertisers are able to compare small changes to an ad to see which has more impact. The statistical results of testing are used to tweak creative content to generate a better version.