Tagged 'content'

Farewell Q&A with NY Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 2): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 17th, 2015 at 10:03 am

Content marketing may get a lot of buzz these days - but it's as old as advertising itself.
In part two of my conversation with longtime New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliott, we continue to talk about how social media has paradoxically fueled growth in television viewership - especially for events like the Super Bowl.
But as part of this wide-ranging farewell Q&A with Elliott - who retired in December after nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times - we get into sponsorship advertising, as well as so-called content and video marketing.
Surprise: None of this is future-forward at all. Indeed, it's a return to the golden age of advertising. But while it sideswipes the problem of ad-skipping technologies and an ever-expanding universe of digital distractions, it comes with some considerable challenges of its own.
Photo: New York Times
Click Here to Download: Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOTT: WHAT I SAW AT THE REVOLUTION (PT 2) - THE RISE (& RISKS) OF CONTENT MARKETING
(Approx: 5:40)

5 Essentials To Your Content Management Strategy

Posted by Jeffrey Fleischman on January 12th, 2015 at 5:14 pm

Content has become a dynamic, sophisticated tool that can have tangible, bottom line results. But these results don’t come easily; content take considerable work, commitment, endurance, dedication, and organizational alignment. Across the enterprise functional areas beyond marketing and corporate communications are generating content and these efforts need synchronization.

Eulogy For a Blog: Most Blogs Die Before The Sixth Post

Posted by Allison Freeland on October 20th, 2014 at 12:22 pm

Everyone has access to publishing these days, but are all blogs created equal? Feldman Creative and ClearVoice unveil the truth about blog publishing in an infographic titled "Eulogy for a Blog".

Report: Social Media Analysis – Luxury Auto Manufacturers

Posted by Doug Schumacher on July 24th, 2014 at 12:33 pm

Automobiles are often objects of passion, and as such, can be well suited to social media. But as this report shows, not all luxury autos are created equal. At least not when it comes to drawing fans and generating engagement on social networks.
The Zuum report “Social Media Analysis - Luxury Autos” is an industry benchmarking and content exploration into where the fans are in that industry, and what engages them. It looks at 12 of the Luxury Automobile brands. Social media networks included in the analysis are Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Google+ and Pinterest.
Key Highlights and Takeaways:

Facebook is the dominant network for most brands in this industry, but considerable activity is moving over to Instagram
Google+ has considerable fan base overall, but is driving minimal engagement with brand content
There’s surprisingly little promotion of posts on Facebook from these brands
Mercedes is prompting their fans on Facebook to join them on Instagram. A possible move in reaction to Facebook’s declining reach issue.
Auto-enthusiast magazines are generating significant engagement for some of the brands, something brands should leverage when possible, as not all press will be entirely possible.

Brands analyzed are: Acura, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Infiniti, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volvo.

Case Studies: 4 Ways to Take Charge of Social Media UGC

Posted by Daniel Taibleson on April 14th, 2014 at 8:54 am

Do you allow your social media visitors to create and post content? If not, why should you even allow your communities to do this? There's actually a legitimate business case for UGC (user-generated content), as it offers these benefits:

Your visitors experience more of your website. They get to see fresh content, and you don't have the sole responsibility for generating it.
Your visitors trust your information. Because UGC is more personal and relevant to your website's visitors (and comes from a more objective source), they trust it more than information your company publishes.
Your visitors become more loyal. When they return to your website repeatedly, it becomes a community they enjoy being a part of.

What's the net effect of all these benefits? If people have a better experience, trust your information more and become more loyal to your company, they're more likely to purchase. If you're wondering how to encourage more user-generated content, take a look at a few examples from bigger brands.
Twitter & The Guardian
This prominent British newspaper ran an "Own the Weekend" campaign, where Twitter followers were encouraged to do something cool that weekend, take a picture and tweet it to the newspaper using the #owntheweekend hashtag. To reward... Read more