Tagged 'buyer experience'

The Groom's Still Waiting At The Altar

Posted by Grant Johnson on March 6th, 2014 at 12:26 pm

The title of this post is based on an old Bob Dylan song. You see, and I have said this for years, most social media can be pretty effective at establishing trust and a relationship. Where it typically falls short is the consummation of the relationship, the marriage. Or, in advertising and marketing, the sale and doing business with the advertiser.
At least part of the blame lies with inbound marketing. If you have a great offer or message, you may get too many leads. Think quality over quantity. That’s where testing the right offer/message at the right time to the correct audience becomes so important. Test, test, test.
If you have leads that are less than ideal, they will not be followed up with properly (a big problem in most lead generation programs anyway) and the good prospects will become frustrated and the sales people will lose faith in your marketing because you are providing “bad” leads to them.
I have seen this countless times. With all this inbound marketing it’s actually become worse, because we can generate a greater number of leads faster than ever before, exasperating the divide between sales and marketing.
To begin, make sure you have a follow-up process... Read more

Simple is as Marketing Grows

Posted by Grant Johnson on February 24th, 2014 at 2:32 pm

"If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself," said Albert Einstein.
We live in an over-communicated society.
Heck, when I began in advertising and marketing, adding an outbound phone call to a direct mail campaign was considered "Integrated Marketing."
The fact is, we are exposed to thousands upon thousands of media impressions each and every day.  As such, as consumers, we CRAVE simplicity. If you can simply explain what you are selling (which, by the way, is what advertising and marketing is), and how your product/service will benefit me, then wrap in a compelling reason -- the correct messaging and/or offer, I will likely take the next step in your sales process. But please make sure to explain to me what you want me to do -- call, respond to the email, visit the website, like us, etc...
Precise copy is the key, but we also must consider how we can graphically simplify our message so it is easier to digest and get the point across immediately. Here is an example of what I mean: http://www.a2591.com/2011/03/more-minimalist-effect-in-maximalist.html
Most of these everyday products are, perhaps, better served today as stripped-down versions.
That's why the combination of video and the internet/social media is so... Read more

The State of Human Interaction in Marketing

Posted by Grant Johnson on February 5th, 2014 at 1:15 pm

A funny thing is happening with the proliferation of social media, it is making way too many people LESS social. Walk down almost any high school hallway and you will see. The kids’ text each other rather than converse. Or they Snap Chat, Tweet or use Instagram.
In business circles we seem to prefer email to voice messages and rarely seem to talk to each other, conducting a lot of business electronically via chat, email, webinars and/or, sometimes, conference calls. What about meeting face-to-face?
This may further divide the role of sales and marketing. It’s curious why so many firms still put the two together in one job title. From my experience, they are two different types of thinkers. Most great sales people are not great marketers and most great marketers are not stellar sales people.
It is true that marketing needs to sell today, and input is crucial from both parties. However, when it comes down to it, especially in bigger, considered purchases like in the B2B space, a great sales person can make all the difference in closing the deal.
But it is not limited to B2B. A great retail sales person can turn you into a loyal customer faster than most marketing... Read more

Why You Should Call a Truce with Multichannel Showrooming

Posted by Jeannie Walters on January 21st, 2014 at 9:23 am

It's a losing battle.
At 360Connext, our Customer Experience Investigators™ have been working hard to gather evidence to build a case against showrooming. What we have found may surprise you.
Showrooming is here to stay. Here's why:
Instead of truthfully working to understand the way customers behave, many retailers are trying to combat showrooming in ways that are not truly customer-centric. Customers are not afraid to use the technology that brings more information to their fingertips. The ability to quickly and easily do some comparison shopping right from their smartphones is now commonplace.
What does this really mean for retailers? If you're going to try and battle showrooming, you are going to lose. Customers will most certainly, now more than ever, shop on their own terms.
Embracing showrooming for a win/win experience
Personal care and cosmetics retailer Sephora is winning the loyalty of milions of customers simply by offering a world of choices and encouraging them to shop on their own terms- from mobile, desktop, in real life, or a combination of any of the above.
It goes to show you, if you offer customers the shopping experience THEY want, and embrace their habits and preferences instead of trying to change their behavior, it may take some... Read more

How to Calculate ROI for Customer Experience

Posted by Tony Quin on November 8th, 2013 at 9:45 am

If you’re a marketer, you hear the term customer experience a lot. It’s a convenient catch phrase for all the experiences that a consumer has with a brand from awareness to advocacy and it’s the product of user experience design (UX) work, which focuses on creating superior customer experiences.
While many people intuitively understand that customer experience is pretty important, however, they don’t always see the value of user experience design. Value is the keyword here because at some point you are probably going to have to justify an investment in UX.
For example, the ROI (return on investment) of the user experience for a website has been a comparatively easy to figure out in the digital world. You can value and compare the conversion rate before you redesign a website using UX and also afterwards. Improvements in simplicity and relevance invariably deliver better results, which can be easily measured. The calculation gets harder when a brand has to consider investing in a unified customer experience strategy and execution, however.
Since people hop from channel to channel so quickly and frequently today, a brand can’t have a good experience in one place and a lousy experience in another, especially when all it takes... Read more