Tagged 'branding'

A Restaurateur's Best Friend: Q&A with James McKinney, CEO of SimpleDeal (Pt 2)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 7th, 2014 at 2:25 pm

In part one of my interview with SimpleDeal CEO James McKinney, we heard about how this new app connects passersby with restaurants right at the point of maximum interest.

In part two, we'll hear more about what it means to restaurants - including how they might be able to turn a trove of data into a gold mine.
CLICK TO LISTEN: Q&A: James McKinney, CEO of SimpleDeal (Pt 2)
(Approx 7 min, 25 sec)

Q&A: James McKinney, CEO of Simple Deal – A New Twist on Mobile Deal Apps for Restaurants (Pt 1)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 5th, 2014 at 4:28 pm

I'm digging SimpleDeal, which looks to be a promising new hyper-local mobile app that connects restaurants with customers at the point of maximum interest.
Unlike apps for setting reservations, receiving daily deals, pre-ordering meals and so on, SimpleDeal acts like a kind of digital wingman, enabling passersby to point their mobile phones at a restaurant to see the menu, find out more about its offerings, review any special deals and make a dining decision.
The restaurant can then follow up with new deals if the consumer opts in, but the app capitalizes on what I believe is mobile's greatest promise.
That is to say it is not push-based, it is pull-based - consumer activated, at the consumer's discretion, at the moment when a consumer is most interested in what you have to offer. And it is enabled through an online portal where restaurants can modify their messaging, or change out specials or deals, in real time.
Most important of all, it gives the client restaurant more than just a transactional ROI, it gives them added voice and value, by enabling them to share what they believe makes their offerings unique.
Time will tell if SimpleDeal, which is live in Long Beach California today, and about... Read more

The State of Human Interaction in Marketing

Posted by Grant Johnson on February 5th, 2014 at 1:15 pm

A funny thing is happening with the proliferation of social media, it is making way too many people LESS social. Walk down almost any high school hallway and you will see. The kids’ text each other rather than converse. Or they Snap Chat, Tweet or use Instagram.
In business circles we seem to prefer email to voice messages and rarely seem to talk to each other, conducting a lot of business electronically via chat, email, webinars and/or, sometimes, conference calls. What about meeting face-to-face?
This may further divide the role of sales and marketing. It’s curious why so many firms still put the two together in one job title. From my experience, they are two different types of thinkers. Most great sales people are not great marketers and most great marketers are not stellar sales people.
It is true that marketing needs to sell today, and input is crucial from both parties. However, when it comes down to it, especially in bigger, considered purchases like in the B2B space, a great sales person can make all the difference in closing the deal.
But it is not limited to B2B. A great retail sales person can turn you into a loyal customer faster than most marketing... Read more

Are We Relying Too Much on Behavioral Economics in Brand Marketing?

Posted by Gerhard Jacobs on January 30th, 2014 at 11:51 pm

the times they are a changin’ folks; and the whippersnappers entering our demographic poole aren’t exactly the loyalists we’ve come to know and rely on for continued support

3 Secrets to Powerhouse 'Prankvertising' (Video)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on January 7th, 2014 at 4:43 pm

A growing number of brands are finding that it can pay big to pull pranks on your customers so other people can laugh at them.
Just look at Sony Pictures, which faked this telekinetic rampage inside a local coffee shop - captured in the video above - complete with patrons pushed up the side of the wall, furniture and books blown about – to promote the new remake of the horror classic, “Carrie.”
Or LG. In an effort to show off the lifelike picture on its next-generation IPS video monitors, the consumer electronics giant scared the crud out of people in elevators by making it appear as if the floor is falling away – with the instant fear captured with eye-level cameras.
Or even candy brand Tic-Tac, which combined a flash mob with a giant digital sign – all in the service of creating a hugely embarrassing scene by making unsuspecting passersby believe they have astonishingly bad breath.
Dubbed “prankvertising,” the technique combines real-world antics with digital-age magic to astonish those who see it live, and to delight the many (many) more who will view videos of the shenanigans online.
And it’s catching on – because it costs a fraction of the money of network... Read more