Tagged 'advertising'

Startup Marketing Conference: Storytelling Rules Marketers Need to Know

Posted by Kent Lewis on October 23rd, 2014 at 3:32 pm

At the Startup Marketing Conference, the early afternoon panel on social media and storytelling included the following experts:
Colleen Pettit, Digital Media Manager, DoubleClick (panel host)
Todd Wilms, VP Digital, Neustar
Olivia June Poole, Director of Community Development, RocketSpace
Brewster Stanislaw, CEO and Co-Founder Inside Social

The first question related to content being king and how important it is overall. Stanislaw guided startups to focus on who the content is being produced for and how it can best be distributed. Poole reminded everyone that storytelling is more difficult when you don’t have an existing users, so it is important to get the stories out there early. Wilms took a more jaded approach, and cautioned against content for content’s sake. Take the time to find your voice before ramping up content.
The second question related to finding your story as a startup. Poole suggested interviewing early adopters to find out why they appreciate the product. Sans users, focus on education and thought leadership to start to build your story.
The third question addressed the conundrum of outsourcing content development to agencies or others vs. building it in-house. Poole indicated that agency partners are a luxury, so use them wisely (learn from them then do it on your own).... Read more

Report: Social Media Benchmarks for 5 Industries

Posted by Doug Schumacher on October 15th, 2014 at 12:07 pm

One of the more popular reports we publish are benchmarking reports. As every industry is different, it’s interesting to see how KPIs like fan counts and engagement rates track across different industries, as well as across brands within the same industry.
This report takes a look at 5 major industries: Snack Foods, Fashion Retail, Pet Food, Luxury Auto and QSR Restaurants, assessing each on two major social media KPIs. Fan count, and engagement rate. The networks they are analyzed on include Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Google Plus and Pinterest.
Key Takeaways

Facebook is still the dominant network in each industry. There’s only one industry, Luxury Autos, in which Facebook has less than 80% of the total average community size.

Instagram leads significantly in engagement rate in every industry profiled.

Google Plus is showing both strong community size, and even more surprisingly, high engagement rates, in several of the industries.

Three lessons on how to start a movement from Amex Small Business Saturday

Posted by Robert Davis on October 2nd, 2014 at 11:35 am

Small Business Saturday is probably the best example in recorded history of marketers starting a movement that has achieved widespread societal adoption. Now, I'm not talking about a trend or a fad, but a true movement – a group of people across a broad swath of the population working together to achieve shared goals. In the latest episode of The Unconventionals, PJA President Mike O’Toole sat down with Mary Ann Fitzmaurice Reilly, SVP Customer Marketing and Engagement at American Express. Mary Ann was one of the key individuals responsible for nurturing Small Business Saturday from idea to execution to high-powered social juggernaut.
OK, that’s some serious hyperbole. Here's why it’s completely justified.
It’s incredibly hard for marketers to rise above the forces of compromise to launch a truly great campaign. Building a movement is way, way harder: the public is often skeptical about what's motivating the brand. Authenticity is a real challenge. Marketers might not have the patience (or permission) to stick with it long enough. And success or flop, whatever happens, it happens in public - which means a lot of risk for the brand. Now check out this earned tweet promoting Small Business Saturday in 2012:

Now, any remaining objections to... Read more

Choice Impressions: The Diamond in the Rough

Posted by Bill Guild on September 3rd, 2014 at 12:01 pm

How advertisers use them and what publisher may do about them.
Back in June, I had the privilege of sitting on Joanna O’Connell’s panel at the Cynopsis Digital Big Monetization Summit in New York.  A lively conversation ensued which revealed some of the friction between publishers and advertisers. On the one hand, publishers are represented by supply-side partners that are working to sell blocks of inventory at favorably negotiated prices. Advertisers, on the other hand, are represented by demand-side partners trying their best to cherry-pick impressions and acquire them at rock bottom prices.  My post-conference thoughts reflected on the difference between the premium impressions we have become accustomed to and the new choice impressions.
Premium impressions come from premium publishers.  They are, in fact, defined by the publisher that generates them. Choice impressions, in contrast, occur naturally and can be found anywhere.
Choice impressions are those where the confluence of audience, content, and creative conspire to produce advertiser value.

The impression is choice (as in the preferred cut of meat, or the best seats in the house), because it represents a highly qualified consumer who is currently engaged with content that is relevant to the brand’s message in the creative.  Having caught the right... Read more

3 Things You Should Demand From Your Agencies Today (#3 Is Critical)

Posted by Nathaniel Kangpan on July 23rd, 2014 at 12:39 pm

It's incredible to witness the speed at which the scope and volume of marketing data has been increasing.  It's laughable what was considered big data for most of us even as little as 7 years ago.  I distinctly remember being brought in as a consultant in the mid 2000s to work  with a top tier, global retail bank on a 'big data' project to analyze a customer portfolio of roughly 500,000 records. It was considered a big data project at the time because their analysts could no longer handle the quantity of records since Excel at that time capped out at ~65,000 rows.

Now it's common for marketing analysts to work with millions or even billions of records in impression logs, transaction files, etc.  Oddly, most agencies and ad tech companies don't ultimately provide their clients with any of this detail, choosing instead to report entire campaigns as a single line item in a document generated once a month (like it's still 2002). If the data is available, you should have access to it.

In my opinion, here are three rights you have as a client when you work with an agency or ad tech partner these days:

#1: Knowing where your campaigns... Read more