'Word of Mouth' Category

Web/Text Messaging Jargon Rules the Biz World

Posted by Neal Leavitt on February 28th, 2014 at 7:02 pm

A client recently emailed me that ‘121 meetings might be the sensible approach’ – we were strategizing about holding a press event in advance of a conference.
SMH (‘Shaking My Head’), I wanted to have a bit of fun so SCNR (‘Sorry, Could Not Resist’), I lobbed back a zinger that we should shoot for 122 meetings, figuring AFAICT (‘As Far As I Can Tell’), the client had inadvertently made a typo.
AWK (‘Awkward’). Brain freeze. He meant ‘1 to 1’.
I thought about adding a smiley along with the reply but TBH (‘To Be Honest’), if I see one more emoticon, FMCDH (‘From My Cold Dead Hands’)…you can fill in the rest here.
All of the aforementioned further elucidates what’s finally happened. Internet/text messaging slang has taken over the business world, for better or worse – so, to quote the Borg from Star Trek, ‘resistance is futile.’
AAR (‘At Any Rate’), I started wondering how certain Internet slang, acronyms and text messaging aphorisms have steadily crept into our daily lives. How did this happen?
AFAICT (‘As Far As I Can Tell’), lots of theories abound but here’s a favorite – Harvard sociology professor Steven Shapin noted a few years ago that... Read more

Love Is Everything: Happy Valentine’s Day!

Posted by Denise Zimmerman on February 13th, 2014 at 2:51 pm

Millions will get engaged on Valentine's Day. Billions in products and services will be sold from jewelry to candy to flowers in a celebration of love. If you're not Hershey's, Godiva, 1-800-flowers, Alex and Ani, Red Envelope, Zales - what does this have to do with you?  Everything.
As we mixed, mingled, and shared our customer love stories at the recent iMedia Brand Summit, it was clear we are marketing in an age where human interaction and technology are intersecting in new ways. From wearables to holographic rock concerts, as summit keynoter, Becky Frankiewicz, SVP/GM Global Costco, PepsiCo adeptly put it "We are in the economy of experiences. The rules of marketing have changed. It's about engagement."
True engagement elicits emotion from joy, pleasure, happiness to love. The potential to elicit brand love is possible anywhere and anytime – and eMarketer has the data to prove it. Unlocking the power of love, creating brand evangelists, spreading and sharing brand love - creating true engagement is fundamental to our goals.
Love is one of the most potent human emotions that can connect and power us as a community. It connects us to the most successful brands in the world. It is... Read more

Your Next Chauffeur May Be Your Car

Posted by Neal Leavitt on January 29th, 2014 at 7:34 pm

Wearables, wearables, wearables.
Attendees at CES earlier this month couldn’t avoid them – seemed like every other booth was pitching a smart watch or fitness app.
But the real ‘wow’ factor, in my humble opinion, was all the futuristic car technology on display. Automobiles are quickly evolving into moveable infotainment machines – and many major manufacturers – both foreign and domestic – unveiled prototypes that may be in a showroom near you quicker than you think.
“Cars will become self-aware where they can understand what’s happening inside and outside,” said Thilo Koslowski, an automotive analyst for market research firm Gartner. “We’re going to see a self-aware vehicle that looks out for you, controls the information and focuses on providing the right information at the right times to protect, inform and entertain you.”
Taking this even further, Roger Kay, who heads up market research firm Endpoint Technologies, recently wrote in Forbes that perhaps in less than 20 years, drivers will even have an ‘autopilot’ option, particularly on highways.
Kay said decision-making on a busy freeway is easier for a machine than a person, particularly when the machine can coordinate with other machines on the road.
“Traffic flows are better managed by an omniscient driving algorithm... Read more

Are You Tracking the Right Metrics? The ROI of Customer Loyalty

Posted by Jeannie Walters on January 8th, 2014 at 1:16 pm

What’s the return on investment (ROI) of a loyal customer?
People ask me this question all the time. It’s a great question, and the answer is not as straight-forward as you might think.
The equation is much simpler for customer acquisition expenses and returns.
1 customer > 0 customers
It’s easy to exclaim: We’re winning! We’re on top! If we invest $5.00 in customer acquisition, and we get a customer for $19.99, then it’s easy to see we’ve quadrupled our investment. Yay for us!
The mathematics behind customer loyalty is messy. It’s much more difficult to calculate, there is no simple equation for how to get a solid figure, and it depends on factors that fluctuate, such as discounts. The fatal error, however, occurs when we ignore customer loyalty. You see, even if calculating the customer lifetime value (CLV) is too daunting, you can get still get a good idea of your customer churn rate.
For an excellent explanation and walk-through of CLV, check out this infographic from KISSMetrics.

Keeping it real, churn-style
Churn is a little easier to digest. For the sake of keeping it simple: it’s literally the number of customers you acquire versus the ones you happen to be losing. If you gain 100 customers in a... Read more

3 Secrets to Powerhouse 'Prankvertising' (Video)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on January 7th, 2014 at 4:43 pm

A growing number of brands are finding that it can pay big to pull pranks on your customers so other people can laugh at them.
Just look at Sony Pictures, which faked this telekinetic rampage inside a local coffee shop - captured in the video above - complete with patrons pushed up the side of the wall, furniture and books blown about – to promote the new remake of the horror classic, “Carrie.”
Or LG. In an effort to show off the lifelike picture on its next-generation IPS video monitors, the consumer electronics giant scared the crud out of people in elevators by making it appear as if the floor is falling away – with the instant fear captured with eye-level cameras.
Or even candy brand Tic-Tac, which combined a flash mob with a giant digital sign – all in the service of creating a hugely embarrassing scene by making unsuspecting passersby believe they have astonishingly bad breath.
Dubbed “prankvertising,” the technique combines real-world antics with digital-age magic to astonish those who see it live, and to delight the many (many) more who will view videos of the shenanigans online.
And it’s catching on – because it costs a fraction of the money of network... Read more