'Wireless' Category

Up Up and Away: Commercial Drone Market Ready for Take Off

Posted by Neal Leavitt on August 30th, 2014 at 5:21 pm

Drone proponents prefer using the term Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) or UAS for Unmanned Aerial System (latter term includes the entirety of the flying vehicle and the ground-base communications connection connecting the two). Whatever your preferred verbiage is, drones are poised to become a huge global business and the aerial devices are going to have a significant impact across a wide variety of industries.
Historically, the military has been the biggest user/purchaser of drones; The Wall Street Journal estimated that the U.S. military spent about $3 billion on drone programs in 2012. And many aerospace companies continue to develop highly sophisticated machines that are lightweight and easy to assemble/launch.
Columbus, MS-based Stark Aerospace, for instance, recently rolled out ArrowLite™, a small UAS system that supports the U.S. Army Hunter MQ-5B UAS. It weighs less than 7 lbs. and can be assembled and hand-launched in less than 90 seconds.
Looking beyond the military, commercial drones will soon take on much larger roles for businesses and even for individual consumers. BI Intelligence, a research service from Business Insider, estimates that 12% of an estimated $98 billion in cumulative global spending on aerial drones over the next decade will be for commercial purposes. ... Read more

The Power of Social Influence: From a Bucket of Ice to the End of a Relationship

Posted by Glenn Pingul on August 29th, 2014 at 10:46 am

Hi.  My name is Glenn Pingul and my daughter nominated me to do the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I will donate $25 to ALS and nominate…
By now, I’m sure everyone has been exposed to the ‘ALS Ice Bucket Challenge’ – by either experiencing the freezing sensation or laughing hysterically at the thousands of bloopers circulating on the social media front.  Initiated by one person with a challenge to three people, the phenomenon has now exploded into more than 4 million challenges and more importantly, more than $94 million (compared to $2.7 million during the same period last year) in donated funds to the ALS Association.
This is a great testament to the willingness of people to contribute to the greater good (and to humiliate themselves in the name of good fun), and more than valid proof of the power of social influence. Just think – what other channel or technique can spread the word and drive action that quickly?
Social influence is by no means a new concept or technique – it’s been used by governments, businesses, politicians, etc. for years.  Ever added that ‘other people who bought this also bought this’ item to your online shopping cart or contributed that extra... Read more

Canada Anti-Spam Law (CASL): Why Text Message Marketing is Much Safer than E-Mail Marketing

Posted by Bob Bentz on August 19th, 2014 at 10:37 am

Marketing in Canada sure changed on Canada Day (July 1, 2014) this year.  That’s when the new Canada Anti-Spam Law (CASL) went into effect.
CASL provides one of the strictest anti-spam regulations in the world and it’s clearly designed to drive spammers out of Canada.  And, if you think you’re exempt just because your company is headquartered in the States, think again.  Canadian regulatory agencies are working closely with US regulators like the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to enforce both CASL and its US version, ironically called the CAN-SPAM Act.
Dealing with CASL
For many years, our mobile marketing agency has been providing text message marketing solutions in Canada through our www.84444.ca website.  And, in checking the CASL rules, SMS marketing is subject to the same stringent restrictions as email marketing is.
Not only that, but we sell a lot of our SMS services to advertising agencies and we do a lot of B2B marketing via email to those advertising and promotion agencies.  Over the years, we’ve created a valuable database indeed of advertising agency employee emails that we market our text message short code services to.
Email and CASL
So, when CASL came into play, we had a lot of work on our hands.  That... Read more

5 words becoming obsolete thanks to scientific marketing

Posted by Glenn Pingul on July 31st, 2014 at 12:33 pm

We've all heard the saying "it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks" but when it comes to marketing, those who are willing to learn, and eventually apply the new tricks are the ones who are best positioned to turbo charge their marketing performance.
Changing how you think about, execute, and measure your marketing efforts is not an easy task but the rewards can be significant.
Scientific marketing is not about adding an element of science to your current marketing processes; it’s about using science to completely change how you engage with your customers.  It’s about leveraging new technologies and techniques to understand your customers’ behaviors and intentions to systematically improve how you influence profitable behaviors.
And yes, it’s about transforming how you think about, execute, and measure your marketing efforts, which in turn, is changing up the status quo.  So as we say “out with the old and in with the new”, let’s pay homage to some of the words that are quickly becoming obsolete in today’s age of marketing, science, and technology:
1. Intuition
Very few would debate the sheer genius that lies in the minds of marketers (okay, I may have a biased opinion) but at times, intuition is more... Read more

Selling Your Personal Data: Is It Worth It?

Posted by Neal Leavitt on July 20th, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Last year a student at New York University threw out an interesting challenge – via a Kickstarter campaign, he offered to divulge 60 days worth of private data gleaned from his digital devices.
He raised $2,733 from 213 backers.
And earlier this year, a research team at the University of Trento in Italy reeled in 60 people and their smart phones to participate in an experiment that recorded various personal details and created a marketplace to sell the data. These included phone calls, apps being used, time spent on them, photographs taken, and users’ locations 24/7.
Each week, as reported by MIT Technology Review, the participants took part in an auction to sell the data, e.g., they might want to sell a specific GPS location or total distance traveled, or locations visited on a given day.
While reporting all results could be the topic of another post, in brief, Jacopo Staiano, who headed up the research team, said there were a few key findings:
• Location is the most valued category of personally identifiable information;
• Participants valued their information more highly on days that were unusual compared to typical days;
• People who traveled more each day tended to value their personal information more highly.
Almost 600 ‘auctions’ were... Read more