'Web Analytics' Category

Report: How Tourism DMOs Are Using Instagram

Posted by Doug Schumacher on November 5th, 2014 at 10:54 am

This report provides an insightful look into the posting calendars, engagement levels and campaign themes of the Instagram accounts of 9 state tourism DMOs.

Brand post engagement rate averages on Instagram are 5.48% compared to .39% on Facebook, and .04% on Twitter
Instagram pages on average are growing followers at over 8% for the month of October, compared to .62% for Facebook pages.
Between Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, Twitter gets the most posting volume, but the least engagement.
Pure Michigan’s Instagram page generated more engagements than their Facebook page, despite having less than 20% as many followers.
Pure Michigan’s top campaign theme #upperpeninsula featured community-generated content.

State DMOs in the report: Alaska Travel News, Explore Georgia, Go Hawaii, I Love New York, Pure Michigan, Texas Tourism, Visit California, Visit Colorado and Visit Florida.

2015 Just Around the Corner: So What’s the Skinny on Digital Marketing Trends?

Posted by Neal Leavitt on October 26th, 2014 at 4:37 pm

Quality content. Content marketing. Mobile-friendly content. Ad retargeting.
Scores of pundits and prognosticators awake and arise this time of year from their marketing crypts to make predictions, outline scenarios on what they see as hot digital marketing trends for the upcoming year. And we see a lot of those aforementioned terms – and others – you know what some of them are - year-after-year, being bandied about and re-purposed.
To use some pirate vernacular, “arrrggggghhhhhh!”
All good-intentioned, most impart a lot of useful info-nuggets but it’s easy to get lost in the morass.
So is there anything really interesting that might help drive awareness of products/services, and ultimately sales next year?
Yup.
Internet Retailer recently did a search marketing survey (full results being published in November) from mid-September to mid-October encompassing responses from 95 participants; about two-thirds identified themselves as working for web-only retailers.
Some interesting survey snippets:
• 46.2% reported increased traffic to their e-commerce sites over the past year through natural, or organic search;
• 32.9% generated at least half of their online sales through their paid search and organic search programs combined;
• 40.3% said their search marketing budgets increased over the past year;
• 53.3% said they would increase their pay-per-click search spending... Read more

The Collaborative Economy: What Big Brands are Learning from Disruptive Startups

Posted by Kent Lewis on October 23rd, 2014 at 6:05 pm

The final session of the day at Startup Marketing Conference focused on the collaborative economy and how large brands are learning from disruptive startups. Ben Kaplan from PR Hacker hosted the session and mentioned how brands like GE and Virgin are learning from and collaborating with startups. Kaplan also mentioned Meow Mix CatStarter as a recent example of leveraging a passionate community willing to innovate.
Matt Kaufman, President at CrunchBase, kicked off by sharing an example of how Nestle is working with startup to stay ahead of the game. From his experience, Kaufman believes brands aren’t exactly sure what they want. That means agencies can get into a trap of selling what they know instead of what agencies need. It also increases the chance the brand won’t buy something they are not sure they need, even if they can afford to pay.
Michelle Regner, CEO and Co-Founder of Near-Me.com, discussed how big brands look to her company for help in understanding the customer journey. For example, Cisco wanted a better way to sell used routers and Near-Me created a marketplace for the partners to use. She also mentioned Hallmark creating an Etsy-type marketplace for customers to interact, and Hallmark gets the benefit... Read more

Startup Marketing Conference: Conversion Hacking The Brain

Posted by Kent Lewis on October 23rd, 2014 at 2:16 pm

One of the Godfather’s of landing page and conversion rate optimization, Tim Ash, CEO or SiteTuners, kicked off the afternoon sessions at Startup Marketing Conference. He felt obligated to start at the bottom (of the brain), as it affects how we design successful LPO/CRO campaigns.
For starters, your reptilian brain is…

Lazy
It likes simple choices
It has no patience
It’s automatic

And we as human animals survive by following the four F’s:

Fight (within seconds of meeting people, we figure out how we would kill them)
Flight
Feed (we need to eat to stay alive)
Fornication

Then Ash touched on how your brain actually works*:

Is it dangerous? -> Deal with it or, if yes…
Is it novel? -> Ignore it, or, if yes…
Consciously explore it.

*95 percent of our actions are pre-conscious.
Then Ash revealed The New Sales Funnel:

The Brain Stem
Limbic System
Neocortex

The goal is to make sure consumers have a small number of clear choices. He adds a caveat in regards to The Long Tail, where more choices are better, but only for specific situations (like looking for music, a book or movie). It doesn’t work when making business decisions (whether it be a pen or marketing automation platform). Here are a few LPO/CRO strategies:

Remove similar choices (they are distracting) and keep it... Read more

Data and Disruption

Posted by Greg Kihlström on October 20th, 2014 at 4:30 am

There are billions of dollars at work to try to describe an ever-changing world to industries where opportunities and risks at stake have never been higher. Between the speed of stock transactions and a real-time advertising bid alone, we are often shaping and reshaping our world in increments of fractions of a second.  In the marketing and advertising world alone, this is light-years away from media plans and buys that were done months, weeks, days, even hours in advance.
We live in a world where two competing ideas and philosophies are at work. We have big data, which takes the petabytes of data at our disposal and makes calculations and predictions based on similar cases, people, events, you name it.
The promise of big data is that it can be used to predict what people will do, when and where they will do it, and how much they are willing to pay for it. It uses as many factors as can be obtained, and models them based on what other, similar people have done. Age, gender, location, previous purchase, and anything else marketers can get their hands on are used to get to the best guess of when a purchase decision will... Read more