'Targeting' Category

Maybe You Deserve This Match

Posted by Neal Leavitt on January 28th, 2015 at 8:27 pm

A number of years ago I was retained to provide marketing communications services for a San Diego-based dating site. Good concept, decent funding from private sources, number of stories generated across various media genres. Ultimately, however, it wasn’t enough. Competition was too fierce; site just wasn’t attracting enough eyeballs and the venture folded.
Fast forward to 2015. Buddy of mine asked if I knew of any good dating sites as he was, to quote him, ‘back in the game.’ Told him I hadn’t been following the space for awhile but was curious to see how the industry had evolved.
The dating industry has become huge - $2.2 billion in 2014 according to market research firm IBISWorld; $2.7 billion by 2019. And Pew Research says that of Americans in a committed relationship that have used an online dating site, one in three met online.
Decided to have a little fun so did a bit of research/searching for oddball, offbeat and in some cases, truly weird dating sites. All seem to be flourishing; many have attracted advertising. In short, your future significant other may just be a few clicks away, no matter your fetishes.
So here are a few:
Vampersonals... Read more

Technology, Progression, and Adaptation: Is Your Business Poised for Success?

Posted by Anna Johansson on January 23rd, 2015 at 9:06 am

The past couple years have been tough for some of the nation’s leading retailers. From the Target and Home Depot breaches that collectively compromised nearly 100 million credit cards to Sears closing approximately 130 of its stores across the country, it has become clear that no one is immune to outside threats and changing markets. So, how do some organizations continually thrive, while others find themselves in compromising situations? Ask different people and you’ll get varying opinions, but in the end it comes down to technology and progression.
Ever Changing Technologies Force Businesses to Change
In a 2012 article written by John F. McMullen, an incredibly powerful and appropriate quote is cited. It’s by Alvin Toffler and reads, “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.” In other words, Toffler predicted that success would be found in an organization or individual’s ability to be flexible.
In this article, McMullen also states that students starting a four year post-graduate degree will find half of what they learned in their first year to be obsolete by their third year of study.
How can this be? It’s likely due to the incredibly... Read more

The Fusion of Personalization and Automation is Eliminating the ‘Ask’ in Customer Engagement

Posted by Glenn Pingul on January 20th, 2015 at 7:58 am

Although the newness of Siri has long worn off, she still manages to have a strong ‘following’. When you know you need something but just can’t pinpoint the specifics or you know exactly what you need but just not sure how to find it…Siri is ready and willing to find the information you need.  And of course she serves as a good source of entertainment when your kids (or maybe you) decide to ask her ridiculous questions.  (FYI – here’s a good list to reference when you have a little too much time on your hands - http://www.freemake.com/blog/siri-answers-20-hilarious-questions/.)
She’s knowledgeable and she doesn't waste your time – giving you exactly what you need when you ask for it. And although we know she has a bank of automated answers, she still manages to deliver a seemingly personalized response. Now if only Siri was smart enough to know what we needed before we asked (props to my wife for this idea, stemming from her frustration in my ‘inability’ to ask for directions).  But if that was the case, Siri would be in high demand for a role on the digital marketing front!
Every digital marketer knows the value that comes with delivering personalized... Read more

3 Rules for Marketing Future Innovations to REAL Customers

Posted by Jeannie Walters on January 13th, 2015 at 6:30 am

The Consumer Electronics Show, the behemoth of tech conferences, took place in Las Vegas recently and generated a predictable onslaught of product announcements, amazing trade show booths and many discussions around what the customer really wants "next."
Is the future really now for YOUR customers?
Some of the trends emerging are not terribly surprising, but they create a unique challenge for marketers. How should marketers position products and behavior around them when consumers don't necessarily know they are ready for the future?
Case in point: wearable technology is a big part of any of the"what's next" conversations, but studies show many users tire of actually wearing these products quickly, often within a few months.
What can marketers do to speak to their next customers, who don't know what they don't know? Here are a few ideas.
1. Paint the "what you can do" not the "what it can do" picture.
Lowe's came out with more technology around the connected home, a big topic at CES this year. Technology and data are critical to the success of the idea of a connected home, but customers don't care about that, really. In an interview at CES about this, Lowe's Anne Seymour described it this way:
It's about education of... Read more

eSports Racking Up Billions of Viewer Hours – and Dollars

Posted by Neal Leavitt on December 27th, 2014 at 8:16 pm

So your 13-year old son is seemingly spending every waking moment hunched over his Xbox, PS Vita, phone, tablet or (doubtful but some pre-teens and teens still use ‘em) laptop playing one endless video game after another. You’ve morphed into an avatar from his perspective; the video games have become his real world.
What do you do?
Well, if he’s really good, let him play on. eSports has finally reached critical mass and has become a multi-billion dollar business, notes market research firm SuperData Research.
Note the following from a trends brief the company put out last April:
• More than 71 million worldwide watch competitive gaming. In fact, about 14.9 million people tuned in to the 2013 World Series; last year 32 million watched the League of Legends Season 3 World Championship – more than double the audience for our so-called ‘national pastime’!
• The average eSports viewer watches 19 times a month; average session is more than two hours;
• eSports is becoming a revenue driver and marketing vehicle for online game publishers and major brands; former like Riot Games, Wargaming and Valve; examples of latter include Coca-Cola and Intel;
• The International 2013: Dota 2 prize pool was more than $2.8 million; total prize money from... Read more