'Targeting' Category

In Defense of Popups

Posted by Ross Kramer on April 16th, 2014 at 8:02 am

It is no secret that we tout the modal popup as the ultimate tool for building your email subscriber base, and we have the research to prove why. There are still those, however, who avoid using this time-tested tactic for fear that they will annoy – and potentially lose – prospective customers.
Recently, while discussing the effectiveness of exit popups, Listrak Senior Solution Consultant Joe Devine met with the popular popup objection. I thought his response was worth sharing:
The best strategies surrounding pop-ups, side bars, footer overlays, or any other sort of whirligigs are often hotly contested by marketers. Some folks see them as the utter dissolution of all brand integrity, while some of us see them as a necessary engagement tool when trying to achieve revenue goals.
The truth is engagement KPIs are lifted when you strategically increase acquisition. However, with such a broad spectrum of sentiments, one thing is clear: One size will not fit all and testing is key to driving adoption. After years of deploying and testing these technologies, it may seem brash, but the simple fact is, these tools work and work well. For every naysayer, I would challenge you to prove that the... Read more

How To Take Your First Step Toward Targeting Consumers With Behavioral Data

Posted by Ann Breckenkamp on April 4th, 2014 at 11:03 am

Although many marketers talk about the importance of tapping into "big data" to improve their customer experience, a recent study by Razorfish and Adobe sheds light on the fact that a vast majority of marketers fail to use behavioral data in segmentation analysis and targeting execution. Many businesses struggle to incorporate behavioral data into their customer engagement practices for a variety of reasons: the data is difficult to access, they are unclear which data to use, they have trouble gleaning actionable insights from the data, and so on.
But when you approach it systematically, getting started isn’t as difficult as you might think.
In case you are among the 76% of marketers who are looking to take your first step towards sending more targeted communications to your customer base, we have put together the following process for how to think about developing your new campaign strategy.
Step #1: Define Your Goals
As with any new marketing campaign, the first step is to clearly outline your business objectives and definition of success. Your campaign strategy will differ depending on whether your primary goal is to acquire new customers, engage existing customers, drive profitability or something else altogether. Although it may sound obvious, you can expect... Read more

From Interaction to Engagement: Why it’s a Must Move for Marketers

Posted by Glenn Pingul on March 28th, 2014 at 12:40 pm

What’s the difference between an interaction and an engagement? What does it take to move to continuous customer engagement? And most importantly, does the payoff justify the required level of effort?
Online dating seems to be all the rage these days – even earning its own show on Bravo (or so my wife tells me). And while we’ve all seen the eHarmony commercials touting success, it’s still hard not to question the practicality of this approach. You select a few attributes that describe you, receive a recommendation based on someone having a few of your few attributes, and voila – it’s time for your first date! But what’s the chance of turning that first date – which is solely based on a narrow set of attributes and perhaps some assumptions – into a second date and eventually, a long-term relationship?
Luckily for me, I’m a happily married man of nineteen years so I haven’t had to dabble in the online dating scene. Yes, the days of traditional dating required some ‘strategic planning’, but the chance of finding your perfect match was far greater than today’s age of ‘stranger dating’. Engaging in discussion, learning likes and dislikes, observing... Read more

NSA vs. IAB – Where To Look for Privacy Threats

Posted by Bill Guild on March 26th, 2014 at 1:37 pm

Recently there have been stories in the national news about digital privacy violations: messages being intercepted by social media platforms, phone data being collected by the government, and internet users having their online behaviors tracked without consent. Due to breaches in internet privacy, U.S. legislators are calling for restrictions on data use by advertisers. It seems that the issue of privacy is not about to blow over anytime soon. As such, it may be useful to examine how we think about privacy – not what our individual positions are on privacy, but rather the process of evaluating the uses and users that cause us to define our individual positions.
When evaluating privacy, there are two questions to consider:

Is the information that another party can request or acquire about me potentially harmful, if used in an unacceptable manner?
Can the party that requests the information use it in an unacceptable manner or transfer it to another party that might use it in an unacceptable manner?

For example: does the National Security Agency (NSA) have or collect any information that could be used to harm someone? The answer is: they have names, addresses, and current GPS coordinates. If they wanted, they have the capability to... Read more

GDC 2014: Reflections and Ruminations

Posted by Neal Leavitt on March 25th, 2014 at 8:26 pm

So another Game Developers Conference (GDC) has come and gone – 400 panels, roundtable discussions, lectures, tutorials, 350 exhibitors, 20,000+ attendees. Seems like every gaming publication and industry analyst swooned and fawned over Project Morpheus, Oculus Rift, Valve’s Steam Controller and how virtual reality in general is poised to take over the gaming universe.
What was also interesting, however, were the findings of a survey conducted before GDC opened its doors for the 28th time last week, a few emerging gaming industry trends, and one rather dopey game that even its developer said “is a small, broken and stupid game” – yet has now garnered literally millions of views.
The second State of the Industry GDC survey polled more than 2,600 North American game developers who attended last year’s conference. According to GDC, notable trends “include a preference for the PlayStation 4 platform for console developers, the prevalence of self-funded projects and the changing reliance and relationship with publishers.”
The survey indicated that 20 percent of developers intend to release their next game on Sony’s PlayStation 4, slightly edging out Xbox One’s 17 percent. Developers also want to do their own thing – 64 percent want to self-publish. And... Read more