'Entertainment' Category

Web/Text Messaging Jargon Rules the Biz World

Posted by Neal Leavitt on February 28th, 2014 at 7:02 pm

A client recently emailed me that ‘121 meetings might be the sensible approach’ – we were strategizing about holding a press event in advance of a conference.
SMH (‘Shaking My Head’), I wanted to have a bit of fun so SCNR (‘Sorry, Could Not Resist’), I lobbed back a zinger that we should shoot for 122 meetings, figuring AFAICT (‘As Far As I Can Tell’), the client had inadvertently made a typo.
AWK (‘Awkward’). Brain freeze. He meant ‘1 to 1’.
I thought about adding a smiley along with the reply but TBH (‘To Be Honest’), if I see one more emoticon, FMCDH (‘From My Cold Dead Hands’)…you can fill in the rest here.
All of the aforementioned further elucidates what’s finally happened. Internet/text messaging slang has taken over the business world, for better or worse – so, to quote the Borg from Star Trek, ‘resistance is futile.’
AAR (‘At Any Rate’), I started wondering how certain Internet slang, acronyms and text messaging aphorisms have steadily crept into our daily lives. How did this happen?
AFAICT (‘As Far As I Can Tell’), lots of theories abound but here’s a favorite – Harvard sociology professor Steven Shapin noted a few years ago that... Read more

Radio Continues To Have A "Missing Link" To Listeners

Posted by Mark Edwards on February 24th, 2014 at 5:37 pm

I spend a lot of time listening to the radio. All kinds of radio, from AM and FMstations to Pandora, Stitcher, Beats Audio, and a plethora of other streaming services.  And to be clear, if it's sound coming our of a speaker, it's radio.  Period. After having spent more than three decades programming radio stations, it's hard not to have sound in the background.  I also spend a lot of time on the Internet, sometimes looking at stations' websites and Social Media outposts.  What I see online frightens me because most of the terrestrial radio stations, and even some of the streaming services, have a disconnect between their audio product and their online presence, what I call THE MISSING LINK.
In other words, most audio content providers don't think about how people USE their product, what else they're doing when they're listening, or most importantly, how they can take the product that comes out of the speakers to a computer or smartphone screen.  Because every day there are less audio delivery devices like the one above and more like this.
Of course, there are still a lot of audio delivery devices that aren't smartphones, but mobile is becoming king and smartphones are... Read more

Your Next Chauffeur May Be Your Car

Posted by Neal Leavitt on January 29th, 2014 at 7:34 pm

Wearables, wearables, wearables.
Attendees at CES earlier this month couldn’t avoid them – seemed like every other booth was pitching a smart watch or fitness app.
But the real ‘wow’ factor, in my humble opinion, was all the futuristic car technology on display. Automobiles are quickly evolving into moveable infotainment machines – and many major manufacturers – both foreign and domestic – unveiled prototypes that may be in a showroom near you quicker than you think.
“Cars will become self-aware where they can understand what’s happening inside and outside,” said Thilo Koslowski, an automotive analyst for market research firm Gartner. “We’re going to see a self-aware vehicle that looks out for you, controls the information and focuses on providing the right information at the right times to protect, inform and entertain you.”
Taking this even further, Roger Kay, who heads up market research firm Endpoint Technologies, recently wrote in Forbes that perhaps in less than 20 years, drivers will even have an ‘autopilot’ option, particularly on highways.
Kay said decision-making on a busy freeway is easier for a machine than a person, particularly when the machine can coordinate with other machines on the road.
“Traffic flows are better managed by an omniscient driving algorithm... Read more

3 Secrets to Powerhouse 'Prankvertising' (Video)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on January 7th, 2014 at 4:43 pm

A growing number of brands are finding that it can pay big to pull pranks on your customers so other people can laugh at them.
Just look at Sony Pictures, which faked this telekinetic rampage inside a local coffee shop - captured in the video above - complete with patrons pushed up the side of the wall, furniture and books blown about – to promote the new remake of the horror classic, “Carrie.”
Or LG. In an effort to show off the lifelike picture on its next-generation IPS video monitors, the consumer electronics giant scared the crud out of people in elevators by making it appear as if the floor is falling away – with the instant fear captured with eye-level cameras.
Or even candy brand Tic-Tac, which combined a flash mob with a giant digital sign – all in the service of creating a hugely embarrassing scene by making unsuspecting passersby believe they have astonishingly bad breath.
Dubbed “prankvertising,” the technique combines real-world antics with digital-age magic to astonish those who see it live, and to delight the many (many) more who will view videos of the shenanigans online.
And it’s catching on – because it costs a fraction of the money of network... Read more

Infographics Accelerating Online Marketing Efforts

Posted by Neal Leavitt on December 28th, 2013 at 10:25 am

In one form or another, they’ve been around for centuries.
Infographics- to use a buttoned down definition, are basically an assemblage of data depicted in visual form.
In fact, one of the earliest infographics was created by Christophe Scheiner, a 17th century German priest, physicist and philosopher. In 1630, Scheiner wrote Rosa Ursina (1630), his magnum opus on sunspots. He used infographics to illustrate the sun’s rotation patterns.
Jump-start almost 400 years. In today’s often frenetically paced digital world, infographics have now become yet another important online marketing communications tool, not only for the private sector, but increasingly in the public sector too.
Ai Ching Goh, co-founder of Penang, Malaysia-based Piktochart, which offers both free and fee-based infographic solutions, says teachers and students create about 20 percent of the infographics on Piktochart. She added the company recently surpassed 600,000 users worldwide.
According to David Jenyns, founder of MelbourneSEOServices.com, a Melbourne, Australia SEO consultancy, while the technology to create infographics hasn’t changed dramatically over the past 12-24 months, what has accelerated its growth/usage is the speed in which infographics is shared.
“Services like Slideshare and Pinterest are encouraging more people to use infographics; clients are finding that infographics are especially good... Read more