'Entertainment' Category

Which Super Bowl commercial won the game?

Posted by Winnie Brignac Hart on March 12th, 2015 at 12:17 pm

With 55 commercials, it was tough. From a strategic marketing perspective, we reviewed the commercial’s ability to stand out from the competition, effectiveness in speaking to target audience and it’s ability to create buzz and be shared by others.
Each commercial was rated on TwinEngine’s True North Brand Radar indicators:

Stands out from the competition
Is authentic
Reflects value
Is easy to understand
Is relevant to the audience
Is properly positioned from the competition
Delivers desired benefits
Is likely to create buzz and be shared by others

Our Top 5 Super Bowl Ad Blitz Picks
1. Mophie 2015 Game Day Commercial - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVsf_hE7gM
2. Avocados from Mexico: First Draft - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JF02QdpPJlk
3. Clash of Clans: Liam Neeson - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GC2qk2X3fKA
4. Snickers: Danny Trejo / Marcia Brady - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbomTIWCZ8
5. BMW: Newfangled Idea - http://twinengine.com/2015/02/which-super-bowl-commercial-won-the-game/

FAREWELL Q&A WITH NY TIMES AD COLUMNIST STUART ELLIOTT (PT 3): CHANGE IS (ON) THE AIR

Posted by Rick Mathieson on March 4th, 2015 at 6:47 pm

In part three of an expansive "exit interview" I conducted with Elliott just weeks after he announced his retirement in December - he points to how ad agencies used to pretend they were bigger, until that became a liability, and why brands had better keep up with demographic trends, or risk being risk being left behind.
Photo: New York Times
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO: FAREWELL Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOT: WHAT I SAW THE REVOLUTION (PART 3) - CHANGE IS (ON) THE AIR
(Approx: 3:53)
Listen to Part One here: What I Saw at the Revolution
Listen to Part Two here: The Rise & Risks of Content Marketing

Farewell Q&A with NY Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 2): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 17th, 2015 at 10:03 am

Content marketing may get a lot of buzz these days - but it's as old as advertising itself.
In part two of my conversation with longtime New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliott, we continue to talk about how social media has paradoxically fueled growth in television viewership - especially for events like the Super Bowl.
But as part of this wide-ranging farewell Q&A with Elliott - who retired in December after nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times - we get into sponsorship advertising, as well as so-called content and video marketing.
Surprise: None of this is future-forward at all. Indeed, it's a return to the golden age of advertising. But while it sideswipes the problem of ad-skipping technologies and an ever-expanding universe of digital distractions, it comes with some considerable challenges of its own.
Photo: New York Times
Click Here to Download: Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOTT: WHAT I SAW AT THE REVOLUTION (PT 2) - THE RISE (& RISKS) OF CONTENT MARKETING
(Approx: 5:40)

Report: Fashion Events & Social Media: 4 Campaigns Analyzed

Posted by Doug Schumacher on January 29th, 2015 at 4:08 pm

How does a fashion brand leverage a major industry event? This report analyzes the content strategies and tactics of four major luxury fashion brands during Milan Fashion Week. The following slides will reveal details about each brand’s posting calendar, social networks employed, engagement levels generated and the posts that made the biggest impact.
Highlights

Instagram is the dominant social network for live fashion events
Only 1 of the 4 campaigns included posting to Facebook
Posting for each brand is scheduled around their live fashion show

Maybe You Deserve This Match

Posted by Neal Leavitt on January 28th, 2015 at 8:27 pm

A number of years ago I was retained to provide marketing communications services for a San Diego-based dating site. Good concept, decent funding from private sources, number of stories generated across various media genres. Ultimately, however, it wasn’t enough. Competition was too fierce; site just wasn’t attracting enough eyeballs and the venture folded.
Fast forward to 2015. Buddy of mine asked if I knew of any good dating sites as he was, to quote him, ‘back in the game.’ Told him I hadn’t been following the space for awhile but was curious to see how the industry had evolved.
The dating industry has become huge - $2.2 billion in 2014 according to market research firm IBISWorld; $2.7 billion by 2019. And Pew Research says that of Americans in a committed relationship that have used an online dating site, one in three met online.
Decided to have a little fun so did a bit of research/searching for oddball, offbeat and in some cases, truly weird dating sites. All seem to be flourishing; many have attracted advertising. In short, your future significant other may just be a few clicks away, no matter your fetishes.
So here are a few:
Vampersonals... Read more