'Media Planning & Buying' Category

How To Plan Ahead For The Holiday Marketing Season

Posted by Katya Constantine on September 4th, 2014 at 5:09 pm

As summer draws to an end and Back to School season hits high gear, now is the best time to prepare for the upcoming holiday season! Follow our tips and tricks for making the most of the holiday season.

Report: Tourism DMOs – A Social Media Analysis

Posted by Doug Schumacher on September 4th, 2014 at 10:11 am

Performance benchmarking and content analysis of 9 destination marketing organizations across Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Google+ and Pinterest. DMOs included: Alaska Travel News, Explore Georgia, Go Hawaii, I Love New York, Texas Tourism, Visit California, Visit Colorado and Visit Florida.

New Instagram Business Tools

Posted by Tom Edwards on August 26th, 2014 at 7:01 am

Instagram recently announced they are taking major steps to enable brands by providing greater insight into the performance of both organic and paid content. These tools are a welcome addition to the highly visual platform and will create tighter alignment with business goals as it pertains to tracking impressions, reach and engagement.

The tools are built around three primary areas of account insights, ad insights and ad staging.
Account Insights - Account insights is the primary dashboard for mapping performance and engagement of organic content. This includes insights around the weekly performance of content, aggregate impressions over time as well as additional insight into the brands audience.
Here is a screenshot from the Instagram Blog highlighting account insights

Ad Insights - Ad Insights is the campaign performance hub for Instagram paid media that houses brand analytics (impressions, reach and frequency). Instagram, similar to parent company Facebook, are heavily focused on reach and frequency vs. engagement as a primary value proposition for brands. The Ad Insights dashboard is a quick and easy reference against the current campaign goals and all of the data can easily be exported for additional client reporting.

Ad Staging - One of the more exciting tools, especially for Social Agencies that partner... Read more

3 Things You Should Demand From Your Agencies Today (#3 Is Critical)

Posted by Nathaniel Kangpan on July 23rd, 2014 at 12:39 pm

It's incredible to witness the speed at which the scope and volume of marketing data has been increasing.  It's laughable what was considered big data for most of us even as little as 7 years ago.  I distinctly remember being brought in as a consultant in the mid 2000s to work  with a top tier, global retail bank on a 'big data' project to analyze a customer portfolio of roughly 500,000 records. It was considered a big data project at the time because their analysts could no longer handle the quantity of records since Excel at that time capped out at ~65,000 rows.

Now it's common for marketing analysts to work with millions or even billions of records in impression logs, transaction files, etc.  Oddly, most agencies and ad tech companies don't ultimately provide their clients with any of this detail, choosing instead to report entire campaigns as a single line item in a document generated once a month (like it's still 2002). If the data is available, you should have access to it.

In my opinion, here are three rights you have as a client when you work with an agency or ad tech partner these days:

#1: Knowing where your campaigns... Read more

Help Advertisers Find Audiences with Viewable Impressions

Posted by Roy de Souza on July 8th, 2014 at 9:26 am

Advertising has always been a cyclical and tenuous business. The venerable department store magnate John Wanamaker, whom no one even remembers any longer, once said “I know half my advertising is wasted; I just don’t know which half.”  If there’s a blip in the market, advertising is always the first thing to go, and that’s why Madison Avenue is so competitive and littered with Type-A corpses.
What is different now from in Wanamaker’s time is the number of businesses  based on advertising as a business model, as though it can support an infinite number of publishers. Even Google had to diversify. They can’t ALL continue to exist. Before  the internet, we had far fewer publishers than we have now. Some just had to go. Like job opportunities in a downturn, advertising never goes away entirely, but it does shrink.
Advertisers are now choosing among a larger group of publishers, some of whom represent completely new concepts of content and new demographics. So what happens? If you’re a legacy publisher with advertising as a business model, one thing you can do is lower your rates, cut your burn.  Even the New York Times has had to do all this and more.   But there’s something else you can do: you can help advertisers find their... Read more