'Media Planning & Buying' Category

FTC Guidelines Prove Confusing

Posted by Roy de Souza on February 8th, 2016 at 10:12 am

Demand for native and in-app advertising is expected to grow in 2016, and we’re sure that’s a good prediction, because other parts of the advertising business will be coping with the use of ad blockers. However the FTC issued new regulations around native ads just before Christmas 2015.  Our development team is already examining the new regs and making them part of our in-app and native strategies.

“A key thread in the guidelines is that the user needs to know if content is an ad before she clicks and/or consumes content. It outlines in detail the types of placement, size, contrast and language that avoids consumer confusion.”
This is pretty tricky, because in the words of the guidelines themselves,
an act or practice is deceptive if there is a material misrepresentation or omission of information that is likely to mislead the consumer acting reasonably in the circumstances.  A misrepresentation is material if it is likely to affect consumers’ choices or conduct regarding an advertised product or the advertising for the product.
In evaluating whether an ad is deceptive, the FTC considers the net impression the ad conveys to consumers.  Because ads can communicate information through a variety of means – text, images, sounds, etc.... Read more

Play Post-CES Buzzword Bingo

Posted by Rick Mathieson on January 11th, 2016 at 9:54 am

This is one game that's easier to play than avoid.
We're all guilty of overusing tech industry buzzwords. And why not? They play a useful role as common shorthand that (conveniently) confers an aura of "cool" to those fluent in the lingua franca of 21st century business.
But as the tech industry recovers from CES, many of us are finding ourselves feeling buzzword burnout over what feels like an egregious level of noise pollution emanating from Las Vegas last week.
“Disruptive.” “Influencer.”“(Anything)-Hacking.” “Unicorn.” I'm sure we've heard them all this week, many times over.
Never mind that some of this lingo could be headed for limbo faster than Kim (or any other) Kardashian can “Break the Internet.”
“Unicorn,” for instance, is quickly morphing into “unicorpse,” as concerns grow that companies like Gilt, Tango and SFX Entertainment may prove emblematic of some of these hard-to-find beasts with billion-dollar valuations may ultimately fare.
In the meantime, we found some catharsis in a piece last Monday by Shawn Paul Wood in PR Newser, lamenting some of the most irksome buzzwords found in news stories and press releases.
When we mentioned the article in the GEN WOW LinkedIn Group, member Rick Wootten, senior director of global marketing for Seagate, mused about... Read more

Jeb Bush = $35 Million Loser (TV Neophyte)

Posted by Mark Hughes on December 22nd, 2015 at 9:19 am

Jeb Bush has spent a lot of money on television advertisement campaigns. $35 million dollars, to be exact. He is the largest spender of TV campaigning, spending more than the rest of the GOP combined. You would think that, with the amount of money his campaign has thrown towards television, he would be growing in the polls, but here’s the reality:
He’s failing.
The most recent poll shows Bush at just 3%. Jeb Bush’s ad campaign is sinking at a titanic rate. None of his ads are affective. On top of that, the GOP front runner, Donald Trump, has spent just over $2 million dollars (which is a relatively easy feat when the news covers you every single day), but with the amount of money Jeb has put in, one question arose:
Does Jeb Bush have ANYONE who knows/cares about ROI on his TV?
$35 million dollars is a massive budget for any advertising campaign. It’s almost as if his campaign was aiming to be the next Draft Kings. (the exception being that Draft Kings has had an incredibly successful return). With Full Funnel Attribution, the Bush campaign (or any other political candidate) would be able to pinpoint where their advertisements are doing the best and which... Read more

Programmatic Storytelling: From Discovery to Purchase & Beyond

Posted by Joseph Vito DeLuca on October 12th, 2015 at 8:45 am

When it comes to programmatic marketing, the first thoughts to come to mind are typically performance advertising and the ability to purchase cost-effective digital inventory. Lost in the shuffle seems to be not only branding, but the overall communications strategy. Rather than siloing your programmatic in dispart campaigns, incorporate it into your complete marketing mix throughout the customer journey.
It's All in The Data
One of the advantages to serving ads programmatically is having the ability to leverage data to not only achieve smarter targeting measures, but also having the ability to be more relevant with your messaging, which is crucial. Using a mixture of revenue data, customer data, other first-party data and third-party data, you can segment customers based on purchase and behavioral history and vary the message based on location and other demographics to connect the right product to the right customer.
"The key outcome of successfully analysing and utilizing this first-party data is the ability to develop a strategy of truly people-based marketing," writes Christopher Ratcliff of Econsultancy. "People-based marketing means being able to recognize and engage your customers at every touchpoint in real-time and all the time. To facilitate this, technology has to be used to provide uniquely... Read more

Ad Blockalypse Really Happened: Now What?

Posted by Roy de Souza on September 21st, 2015 at 10:31 am

Last week something happened that really goes to the heart of what's occurring in the advertising industry now. If it is given the attention it deserves, it may well change the way the ad industry operates, and we think for the better. It raises ethical questions, economics questions, and freedom of speech questions.
Here's what went down. A well-liked technologist, Marco Arment, who created Instapaper and Overcast, released an ad blocker called Peace into the Apple app store on Wednesday, the day of the IOS9 update. Within 36 hours, he had made $138,000 in $2.99 downloads. His app was the # 1 in the App Store, and the next four top selling app were also ad blockers.
But then he pulled the app. It had taken only a couple of days for him to realize that he was not only blocking ads on his own site, but also those of one of his good friend and colleague John Gruber, publisher of the small site Daring Fireball.  In general, ad blockers will be far more deleterious to  small publishers like Arment and Gruber than to the giants. The giants will get around them by buying "native ads," ads that look like the content they're being... Read more