'Media Planning & Buying' Category

Ad Blockalypse Really Happened: Now What?

Posted by Roy de Souza on September 21st, 2015 at 10:31 am

Last week something happened that really goes to the heart of what's occurring in the advertising industry now. If it is given the attention it deserves, it may well change the way the ad industry operates, and we think for the better. It raises ethical questions, economics questions, and freedom of speech questions.
Here's what went down. A well-liked technologist, Marco Arment, who created Instapaper and Overcast, released an ad blocker called Peace into the Apple app store on Wednesday, the day of the IOS9 update. Within 36 hours, he had made $138,000 in $2.99 downloads. His app was the # 1 in the App Store, and the next four top selling app were also ad blockers.
But then he pulled the app. It had taken only a couple of days for him to realize that he was not only blocking ads on his own site, but also those of one of his good friend and colleague John Gruber, publisher of the small site Daring Fireball.  In general, ad blockers will be far more deleterious to  small publishers like Arment and Gruber than to the giants. The giants will get around them by buying "native ads," ads that look like the content they're being... Read more

Not all data is the right data

Posted by Becca Bleznak on September 15th, 2015 at 12:20 pm

We're all interested in collecting the data that will help us best determine how to reach customers and drive conversions. However, media planning has operated on the assumption that if you have a model in place, and enact the same strategy month-by-month, you should achieve the same results each time. This simply isn't the case, so we must determine: How do we interpret the mass quantities of data in order to create an effective strategy?
The answer, according to Brian Monahan, VP of marketing at Walmart.com, is software. More specifically, WMX, the retail giant's latest venture into connecting its suppliers with the data they need to better market to their audience. As one of the biggest data companies in the world, and the world's second-largest retail site, Walmart.com is fixated on becoming a giant personalization machine.
You see, data can be misleading, and trying to predict commercial activity or understand what someone may buy is not as easy as one might like. In order to gather the best data, a lot of decisions must be made, which is where the software comes in. Your customer will tell you if you are effectively reaching them: You just have to know what to look... Read more

The Repeat: Aol. & Millennial Media

Posted by Jordan Greene on September 3rd, 2015 at 11:24 am

In AOL’s acquisition of Millennial Media, what looks to be a bold move to finally getting into mobile advertising effectively, may be nothing more than a repeat of history.  With the explosive growth in mobile phones and tablets, and the never-ending amount of time that consumers spend sucked into their portable screens, it would seem inevitable that mobile advertising would move on a similar growth trajectory.  AOL thought so too. Eight years ago.  So, we can’t have that short a memory as we have seen this play before.
Back in 2007, AOL purchased the first of the real mobile display ad networks, Third Screen Media, for $110 million.  The idea of that acquisition made the company look ahead of the curve to the outside world.  AOL saw mobile as coming, and acted upon it.  However, the valuation at the time made the company look like it overpaid, and internally the pursuit of the deal was met with great disagreement.
In reality, Third Screen Media was an early house of cards in mobile advertising, with more bluster than substance.  In perfect AOL fashion, instead of augmenting the new acquisition and leading the mobile way, AOL virtually disintegrated the company in the 24 months... Read more

Will An End to Ad Fraud Mean Bigger Budgets?

Posted by Roy de Souza on August 19th, 2015 at 1:32 pm

As buyers begin to demand better metrics on both ad fraud and viewability from publishers, the definition of how to measure ad fraud keeps changing. Like viewability, fraud numbers can vary depending on the third-party monitor. And if you’ve ever seen a rat on a charged grid stop moving because of operational neurosis, you know that marketers won’t unleash the biggest budgets unless they have some standards with which they can feel comfortable.

The only thing that will change all this is greater transparency

The Robot Swarm Is Upon Us

Posted by Neal Leavitt on June 28th, 2015 at 9:30 am

“Exterminate, exterminate.”

-Briefing warning from the Daleks before firing their extermination rays on various "Doctor Who” episodes

What is one of the most well-known catch phrases on the long-running BBC series, “Doctor Who,” might eventually be uttered by a robot greeting you at your front door to take care of your termites.
Farfetched? Maybe right now, but a robot may soon be coming to your home to spray pesticides, clean your windows, and perhaps even tutor your kids.
ABI Research expects the global market for consumer robots to top $6.5 billion by 2017. BI Intelligence says the market for consumer and office robots will grow at a CAGR of 17% between 2015-2019, seven times faster than the market for manufacturing robots.
And some other key takeaways from BI Intelligence in their ‘The Robotics Market Report’:
• Three distinct categories will dominate the consumer/office side: home cleaning and maintenance; telepresence (i.e., telecommuting to events or remote offices) and advanced robots for home entertainment.
• The ubiquity of smartphones and tablets is making it easier to develop robots for consumer and office applications. The report says mobile devices offer designers the opportunity to ‘outsource’ computing and user interface tasks to companion devices, allowing developers... Read more