'Jobs' Category

7 Ways to Monitor Employee Performance and Behavior

Posted by Morgan Sims on March 24th, 2014 at 2:27 pm

When it comes to a typical workday, it’s important that everyone stays on task. Unfortunately, with Internet’s availability, that’s extremely difficult to do. With work often seeming mundane, workers tend to slip off to a website for a few minutes, only to stay there for longer than they originally intended. For that reason, it’s essential that you have a way to monitor employee performance or behavior. Here are a few ways you can do just that.
Filter Websites
Rather than sitting there and monitoring each individual website your employees access, cut it out altogether by filtering out certain websites. Sure, this will probably make some people mad, but they weren’t supposed to be accessing them on company time anyway. Make sure to thoroughly ban them, though — many creative employees are finding ways around this, such as accessing the website by IP address instead of web address.
Install Keyloggers
Though this is a much more drastic measure, it’s also a highly effective measure. If you’re just dying to know what your employees do on company time, install a keylogger on their computer. This will record every keystroke registered on the computer, regardless of where it comes from. Keyloggers can be installed to the computer... Read more

Why NOT To Hire Your Most Qualified Candidates

Posted by Jeannie Walters on March 11th, 2014 at 10:10 am

The work-from-home culture
If culture is king for a superior customer experience, as we say here at 360Connext, it seems working from home is a prime example. It's argued over and debated, given and taken away, loved by some and hated by others.

We run a virtual company. That means the entire team – CEO included – works from wherever we wish using the amazing tools available to us – GoToMeeting, Office 365, Evernote, Box, and even Google Hangouts – to attend meetings, collaborate, and deliver to our clients.
BUT the virtual culture is a critical part of how we hire. Some people just can't be comfortable without the structure and security that come with a brick-and-mortar office. I know many people who simply need a place to report to in the morning. There's certainly nothing wrong with that. But qualifications aside, these people simply can't fit into this culture.
Your own culture is sacred.
This raises questions about a bigger issue. If you're not hiring for your culture, you are inviting issues that create problems for your best employees. While working with corporate clients, I’ve been exposed to the training programs that include titles like “How To Work with Difficult People.” Unfortunately, this means there are... Read more

How To Make Sure Your Social Media Profiles Catch the Eyes of Marketing Recruiters

Posted by Willie Pena on January 31st, 2014 at 11:32 am

Social media profiles offer a chance to present yourself as a brand. Regardless of whether or not you are currently employed, you never know when you’ll need to look for a position in the future. So, as a potential job candidate, regularly assess the image projected by the vacation pictures, likes, group memberships, status messages and relationship chatter on your social media pages. Ask if the content on your page truly represents your skill set and the best side of your personality. Many businesses keep an eye on social media and crosscheck applications with the candidates’ online profiles. Rather than have Twitter, Instagram or Facebook become a liability, here are tips to use social medial profiles to attract the attention of recruiters.
1. Demonstrate your professional competence.
Share and comment on articles related to your job; show you have a well-informed opinion. Use impeccable grammar. Give helpful advice to followers or friends in your field when they ask work-related questions; present information in such a way that it’s evident you are an expert in your profession. Sing your own praises by linking to any mentions of you in the news or on company postings. Re-tweet whenever someone gives you accolades professionally,... Read more

In Praise Of The Under Appreciated HR Department

Posted by Mark Edwards on January 10th, 2014 at 1:04 pm

Here's a question for business owners and managers. When was the last time you hugged your HR department?

It occurs to me that the human resource manager, human resource assistants, recruiters or whatever you call the people in your HR department are the unsung heroes of business in 2014. They have to find the right people, train the people, and then retain the people for it as long as possible. With all the talent available these days, that's a very very tall order.

Yes, the government says that the unemployment rate dropped to 6.7% today. Theoretically, that's good news, especially if you ignore the low number of jobs created in December. But it also means that a lot of people have just stopped looking for jobs and left the work force. And that might make the HR department's job a little harder because some of those people could be diamonds in the rough for your company. Perhaps their skill set doesn't exactly line up with what you're looking for, maybe they are over 40 and have had jobs in industries that don't exactly match yours, or maybe they just were honest about how much money they wanted to make when they filled out... Read more

Top 5 Things to Know About “Thank you” Letters

Posted by Jane Turkewitz on November 20th, 2013 at 7:20 am

The “thank you” letter. Sounds old school. But, when it comes to this topic, old school isn’t a  bad thing.
I have seen many candidates completely blow their chances of getting a job by not properly following up after an interview. A strong “thank you” note is incredibly powerful for 5 key reasons:

It Shows Off Your Follow Up Skills — This is of the utmost importance if you are applying for a sales position. The interviewer is going to assume that your follow up with her is a direct reflection of how you would follow up with a client.  Even if your specialty area does not include client-facing responsibilities, chances are you are interviewing for a position that will require you to manage projects, liaise with internal departments and/or oversee external vendors. In any one of these cases, strong organizational and communications skills are necessary and the “thank you” letter is basically a mirror into how you would perform these duties.
It Shows Off Your Listening Skills — An interview is a give and take session in which you learn about a company and a position and the hiring manager learns about your skills and how you can possibly make a positive... Read more