'Emerging Platforms' Category

FAREWELL Q&A WITH NY TIMES AD COLUMNIST STUART ELLIOTT (PT 3): CHANGE IS (ON) THE AIR

Posted by Rick Mathieson on March 4th, 2015 at 6:47 pm

In part three of an expansive "exit interview" I conducted with Elliott just weeks after he announced his retirement in December - he points to how ad agencies used to pretend they were bigger, until that became a liability, and why brands had better keep up with demographic trends, or risk being risk being left behind.
Photo: New York Times
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO: FAREWELL Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOT: WHAT I SAW THE REVOLUTION (PART 3) - CHANGE IS (ON) THE AIR
(Approx: 3:53)
Listen to Part One here: What I Saw at the Revolution
Listen to Part Two here: The Rise & Risks of Content Marketing

Women in Tech Industry Still Facing Career Challenges

Posted by Neal Leavitt on February 25th, 2015 at 7:39 pm

A few months ago a long-standing colleague of mine decided to leave her tech company after 14 years. The pay was good, benefits great, but she came to the realization that she couldn’t breach that proverbial ‘glass ceiling.’ Despite her stellar qualifications, she resigned.
She’s now getting her teaching credential and wants to teach computer programming to high school students. Any high school that hires her will immediately be that much better.
But her story isn’t an isolated one. Tracey Lien recently wrote in the Los Angeles Times that women are leaving the tech industry in droves. It’s becoming a significant issue for the tech economy.
“According to the industry group Code.org, computing jobs will more than double by 2020, to 1.4 million,” said Lien. “If women continue to leave the field, an already dire shortage of qualified tech workers will grow worse. Last summer, Google, Facebook, Apple and other big tech companies released figures showing that men outnumbered women 4 to 1 or more in their technical sectors.”
Vivek Wadhwa, a tech entrepreneur and fellow with Stanford University’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance, said that when women go to venture capitalists seeking financing for their new startups, they are sometimes treated differently... Read more

3 tips for embracing digital transformation

Posted by Jacqueline Lisk on February 23rd, 2015 at 12:30 pm

New technology and users' changing behaviors have dramatically altered the way marketers find and communicate with their target audience. But understanding and adopting new tactics can prove challenging, especially for large organizations. At the iMedia Brand Summit in Amelia Island, Florida, Chris Cox, senior manager of global digital marketing at The Hershey Company; Chris Crayner, SVP, integrated media and digital at Universal Orlando; and Adam Kmiec, senior director of mobile, social and content marketing at Walgreens, shared their experiences effectively leveraging new technology, social channels, and real-time data in a panel moderated by Jeff Rosenblum, co-founder and partner of Questus.
Their tips for staying ahead of the customer and competition without disrupting the organization include choosing the right tools, recruiting the right talent, and effectively communicating key data-based findings across all levels of the organization.

Choose the right tools
Cox advised marketers to resist the temptation to try every new channel and tool. Rely on metrics to determine what’s working and scale accordingly. "Sometimes fewer better bets is the solution," he said. Additionally, be willing to customize your approach for your different products and target audiences. "It’s not going to be a 'one-size-fits-all' approach," he noted.
"Don't get distracted by the shiny new object,"... Read more

8 Marketing Truths about Snapchat

Posted by Tom Edwards on February 20th, 2015 at 9:35 am

Snapchat is deliberately distancing itself from the social platforms that have come before it. With a shift from a creation to consumption model, the roadmap on how best to leverage Snapchat is clear.

Here are eight truths that marketers need to understand about how Snapchat views itself — and the ideal approach to maximizing the value of the platform.
1 - Snapchat is Not a Social Network. The Snapchat team has made it clear that it does not consider itself a social network. Instead, Snapchat is positioning itself as an ephemeral communication and consumption platform. This is a key point to consider when defining an approach to maximizing the platform.
2 - Attentive Audience. Snapchat boasts 50 million users in the US with a primary demographic of 14-28 years old. The average user frequents the app 14-22 times per day. It’s clear that Snapchat considers its platform as the “new TV” for this demo. From an attention and eyeballs perspective, driving views with this demographic is a key benefit of the platform.
3 - Consumption vs. Creation. Initially, Snapchat was a 1:1 content creation platform. Snapchat viewed the native phone camera as a competitor. With the recent shift with the Our Story offering and... Read more

Farewell Q&A with NY Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 2): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 17th, 2015 at 10:03 am

Content marketing may get a lot of buzz these days - but it's as old as advertising itself.
In part two of my conversation with longtime New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliott, we continue to talk about how social media has paradoxically fueled growth in television viewership - especially for events like the Super Bowl.
But as part of this wide-ranging farewell Q&A with Elliott - who retired in December after nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times - we get into sponsorship advertising, as well as so-called content and video marketing.
Surprise: None of this is future-forward at all. Indeed, it's a return to the golden age of advertising. But while it sideswipes the problem of ad-skipping technologies and an ever-expanding universe of digital distractions, it comes with some considerable challenges of its own.
Photo: New York Times
Click Here to Download: Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOTT: WHAT I SAW AT THE REVOLUTION (PT 2) - THE RISE (& RISKS) OF CONTENT MARKETING
(Approx: 5:40)