'Creative Best Practices' Category

Social Media Helping Level the Playing Field for Craft Breweries

Posted by Neal Leavitt on June 29th, 2014 at 8:14 pm

Craft breweries have produced scores of award-winning beers over the years and according to the Houston Chronicle, will garner sales of over $7 billion nationwide in 2014. But just having a tasty ale or lager is no guarantee these days for long-term business success as the gigantic ad/marketing budgets of the major breweries can drown out craft breweries attempts to snare market share.
“The number of new craft breweries has exploded in the past few years and the market is getting crowded,” said Melani Gordon, who co-founded San Diego-based TapHunter. The company provides on- and off-premise accounts with time- and money-saving tools that automatically update beverage inventory on social media channels, websites, and print, digital display, and tablet menus. This exposure empowers their customers by helping transform beer, spirits, and cocktail menus into valuable revenue producers.
Gordon said those craft breweries that don’t put some serious thought behind their brand and voice will struggle.
“There’s no magic formula for craft breweries to find consumers so the new breweries need to build a brand and web presence because it’s challenging today to stand out,” added Gordon. “In addition, there are a lot of inefficiencies in the retail distribution model, making it... Read more

How to Turn Unhappy Customers into Loyal Ones

Posted by Jeannie Walters on June 3rd, 2014 at 10:34 am

We tend to buy from people we like, even when they’re offering the same products or services for the same prices (or even higher) than people we don’t like. Are we being foolish, or just being human?

More than 95% of human thinking is driven by non-conscious influences. This means we often don’t even know why we react the way we do. Our emotions, typically, are driven by interactions we've had with other people.
Remember your last bad day at the office? Customers were unhappy, employees were crabby, and then your internet connection disappeared. At the end of a day that seemed too long to bear but too short to straighten everything out, what if a client called to express their gratitude for an excellent experience? You were able to go home with a smile on your face. When you talk about that day six months later, you’ll likely refer to the lows (feeling bad about all the things that went awry) and the highs (feeling proud of making a client so happy they called to tell you about it.)
Create Memorable Experiences with the Peak-End Rule
Peaks in all experiences are what create the memories. The highs and the lows are what customers... Read more

Google Data Protection Opinion May Ruffle Feathers of Businesses Worldwide

Posted by Neal Leavitt on May 30th, 2014 at 6:43 pm

A non-binding opinion handed down earlier this month by the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU), the European Union’s highest legal authority, is roiling the business community. While the opinion needs the approval of all 28 EU governments before it can become legally binding, there’s already a lot of online chatter about the potential blowback to businesses operating in the EU.
The case followed complaints in March 2010 from Mario Costeja Gonzalez, a Spanish lawyer, who said that when Google’s search results revealed details on an auction of his repossessed home in a local newspaper (La Vanguardia), it infringed on his privacy rights.
CJEU ruled that people have the “right to be forgotten” and can ask Google to remove some sensitive information from Internet search results. Tech companies, noted the Financial Times, fear it may be “the beginning of a broader assault in which Google would be regulated like a utility.” Or to use an oft-used English idiom, it could be “the thin end of the wedge.”
No surprise then that organizations and associations from all walks of life are now weighing in with their two bits/bytes.
“Individuals may now have the ability to essentially go in with a... Read more

Report: Beauty Brands on Instagram

Posted by Doug Schumacher on May 29th, 2014 at 4:22 pm

As our recent report “7 Brands Generating More Engagement on Instagram than Facebook” highlighted, brands are definitely connecting with their audience on platforms outside Facebook.
This reports delves into the beauty category. Looking at how activity compares between Facebook and Instagram, and what brands are doing to success on Instagram. The report compares ten top beauty brands across 6 social networks: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+, Instagram, and Pinterest.
Highlights

Facebook is the dominant social network in terms of fan count: Average of 72% of all communities reported on
Instagram is only the 4th largest community based on industry average.
Industry-wide, 77% of all social content engagements are happening on Instagram. Facebook garners 27%.
NYX, the brand with the smallest overall fan count, has the most overall engagements (97% of those engagements happened on Instagram.)
Engagement rates for the top industries are: Facebook = .13%, Twitter = .019%, Instagram = 3.14%

The brands analyzed are Chanel, Clinique, Covergirl, Dior, Estee Lauder, L’Oreal Paris, Mac Cosmetics, Maybelline NY, NARS Cosmetics and NYX Cosmetics. Those ten brands were selected from a larger pool based on their overall social media community size.

Joseph Carrabis' Under the Influence: What's this survey about?

Posted by Joseph Carrabis on May 27th, 2014 at 2:17 pm

Hello, it's me again. How you been? Comfortable? You make a good living?

That last sentence is the punch line of an old joke; Some poor fellow has an automobile accident. Some people rush to help him. One person takes off his jacket, makes a pillow out of it, rests the injured fellow's head on it and asks, "Are you comfortable?" The fellow responds, "I make a good living."

For those not familiar with such things, the front of the joke is called the send up and the back of the joke is the punchline, although other disciplines know them as prime and release.

Truly good surveys (and I'll explain my definition in a minute) do the same thing; they prime and release. The priming part causes the participant to focus on something, the release part comes after the participant has stopped focusing on that thing and before they go onto the next thing. The release is when the brain and mind rest, essentially catching their neural breath, before going onto the next task in the survey.

A Truly Good Survey...

... has covert and overt elements. The overt part is the survey's look and feel, how it's delivered, how it's administered, how participants are... Read more