'Creative Best Practices' Category

Women in Tech Industry Still Facing Career Challenges

Posted by Neal Leavitt on February 25th, 2015 at 7:39 pm

A few months ago a long-standing colleague of mine decided to leave her tech company after 14 years. The pay was good, benefits great, but she came to the realization that she couldn’t breach that proverbial ‘glass ceiling.’ Despite her stellar qualifications, she resigned.
She’s now getting her teaching credential and wants to teach computer programming to high school students. Any high school that hires her will immediately be that much better.
But her story isn’t an isolated one. Tracey Lien recently wrote in the Los Angeles Times that women are leaving the tech industry in droves. It’s becoming a significant issue for the tech economy.
“According to the industry group Code.org, computing jobs will more than double by 2020, to 1.4 million,” said Lien. “If women continue to leave the field, an already dire shortage of qualified tech workers will grow worse. Last summer, Google, Facebook, Apple and other big tech companies released figures showing that men outnumbered women 4 to 1 or more in their technical sectors.”
Vivek Wadhwa, a tech entrepreneur and fellow with Stanford University’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance, said that when women go to venture capitalists seeking financing for their new startups, they are sometimes treated differently... Read more

Farewell Q&A with NY Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 2): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 17th, 2015 at 10:03 am

Content marketing may get a lot of buzz these days - but it's as old as advertising itself.
In part two of my conversation with longtime New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliott, we continue to talk about how social media has paradoxically fueled growth in television viewership - especially for events like the Super Bowl.
But as part of this wide-ranging farewell Q&A with Elliott - who retired in December after nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times - we get into sponsorship advertising, as well as so-called content and video marketing.
Surprise: None of this is future-forward at all. Indeed, it's a return to the golden age of advertising. But while it sideswipes the problem of ad-skipping technologies and an ever-expanding universe of digital distractions, it comes with some considerable challenges of its own.
Photo: New York Times
Click Here to Download: Q&A WITH STUART ELLIOTT: WHAT I SAW AT THE REVOLUTION (PT 2) - THE RISE (& RISKS) OF CONTENT MARKETING
(Approx: 5:40)

The Perfect Small Business Marketing Tool

Posted by Anna Johansson on February 17th, 2015 at 8:53 am

The internet is saturated with content, and your business needs to find a way to stand out. In 2015 – as in years past – the infographic will be the favorite tool for many. With engaging graphics, relevant statistics, and a unique, creative flare, infographics are becoming the top choice for content marketing for a single reason: consumers love them. Online buyers absolutely can’t get enough of infographics and find them compelling.
The Value of Visual

As more data is collected and research studies are analyzed, it’s becoming apparent that consumers prefer visual marketing pieces to text-based content. In fact, it’s worth noting that the brain processes visuals some 60,000 times faster than text. Combine that with the fact that 90 percent of information transmitted to the brain is visual and it becomes clear that the future of marketing lies in visual stimulation, not black words on a white background.
While videos certainly have their place, not everyone has the time to watch one. Neither is it always appropriate to watch a video. On the other hand, infographics are visual and always appropriate. That’s why small businesses like yours need to start taking them seriously.
Characteristics of a Successful Infographic

While everyone is... Read more

Farewell Q&A with New York Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 1): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 5th, 2015 at 1:08 pm

The advertising world released a collective gasp when news hit that Stuart Elliott - the longtime advertising columnist for the New York Times - was accepting a buy-out package and would retire.
After nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times, not to mention stints at USA Today and Ad Age before that, Stuart and his column had become must-read for puissant, timely insights on Mad Ave.
And what a quarter century it was. From the early 1990s to today, the ad industry went from analog everything to digital domination; from "Married with Children" to "Modern Family;" and from bigger-is-better, to small is the new black.
"Who could or would have thought in the early ’90s that 20-odd years later the hegemony of television, for decades the most powerful ad medium, would be under siege, or at least, in question" Stuart wrote in his final column December 18.
"Ratings data, the currency of television, is growing problematic because viewership is more difficult to measure when people use mobile devices instead of TV sets; or watch shows online, as streaming video or as video-on-demand. And it is easier than ever for viewers to ignore or avoid traditional commercials; popular streaming services like Netflix are... Read more

Clever Video Ads That Pull Heartstrings

Posted by Roy de Souza on February 5th, 2015 at 6:29 am

In today's fast-paced world, advertising on the Internet has become a necessity for all businesses. More and more people are using the Internet not just for entertainment and news but to seek information before making decisions - right from searching for the best car deals to the perfect life partner. It's no secret that the Internet's growing reach allows advertisers to reach consumers who are skipping TV ads or texting their friends in the commercial breaks instead of watching the ads.
Little wonders that many ad networks have cropped up to sell online advertising. A few networks use "premium" tag to get business out of agencies and advertisers. But in reality ad networks just sell small old banner ads. These are too small to show a powerful message and most are never seen by the TG. Far from premium - they are ineffective and not exciting to clients.
A majority of the agencies now feel that most ad networks are low end and sell the same undifferentiated ineffective banner ads. The humble banner isn't dead yet, but it could certainly be soon. On the other hand, advertising through exciting online video ad formats is hot and only getting hotter. According to Cisco,... Read more