'Creative Best Practices' Category

Common Law Firm Marketing Myths

Posted by Anna Johansson on August 26th, 2014 at 10:04 am

Fans of Breaking Bad are delighted by the news about the Better Call Saul spinoff, featuring Walter White’s less-than-ethical attorney, Saul Goodman. As part of the promotional campaign, AMC has been airing a series of mock attorney ads, such as the tongue-in-cheek “Sue ’Em Now” spot.
While the hilarious teasers are obviously fake, they shed light on an unfortunate misconception among attorneys and audiences alike regarding the ethics and methods of law firm marketing. Rather than instigating frivolous lawsuits to make a quick buck, most law firms have a sincere need and desire to offer their services to potential clients.
But how does a firm distinguish itself from its less well-intentioned counterparts? The key is to understand the principles and best practices of marketing.
Myths that keep law firms from building strong marketing strategies
When law firms shy away from marketing campaigns, they risk laboring in obscurity, and never achieving the growth of which they are capable. Among the myths that keep them from investing wisely in marketing are:

Television marketing looks “tacky.” Late-night, low-budget personal injury law firm commercials often give the profession a bad image. But marketing effectively via television and online video is possible when attorneys use a genuine script, an appropriate... Read more

Report: CPG Snack Foods – Social Media Analysis

Posted by Doug Schumacher on August 25th, 2014 at 11:43 am

Snack Foods have some of the largest social media communities of any product or service category. Our sample of 8 brands -- Butterfinger, Oreo, Reese’s, Skittles, Snickers, Starburst, Twix and Wonka -- has an average Facebook fan count of over 14 million.
The category is a fun, simple product with a lot of room for creative messaging -- perfect for an analysis of how brands like these communicate with and engage their customer base.
Our analysis outlines which networks are generating the biggest impact in the category, and takes a deep dive into the best performing tactics and campaigns these brands are using to engage their audience.
Report highlights

Facebook is the dominant network, with 99% of the total community among these brands
Surprisingly few brands are on Instagram, given the young, casual nature of the product category
The only brand on Instagram, Oreo, generates more engagement there than with their 37 million Facebook fans.
Two brands greatly increased their impact on Facebook through post promotion: Snickers and Wonka
Campaign analysis shows Twitter to be generating little engagement relative to Facebook, while Oreo campaigns implementing Instagram are seeing a significant number of engagements on that network.
Wonka’s RANDOMS product launch campaign used post promotion on Facebook to increase engagement... Read more

Report: Social Media Analysis – Luxury Auto Manufacturers

Posted by Doug Schumacher on July 24th, 2014 at 12:33 pm

Automobiles are often objects of passion, and as such, can be well suited to social media. But as this report shows, not all luxury autos are created equal. At least not when it comes to drawing fans and generating engagement on social networks.
The Zuum report “Social Media Analysis - Luxury Autos” is an industry benchmarking and content exploration into where the fans are in that industry, and what engages them. It looks at 12 of the Luxury Automobile brands. Social media networks included in the analysis are Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Google+ and Pinterest.
Key Highlights and Takeaways:

Facebook is the dominant network for most brands in this industry, but considerable activity is moving over to Instagram
Google+ has considerable fan base overall, but is driving minimal engagement with brand content
There’s surprisingly little promotion of posts on Facebook from these brands
Mercedes is prompting their fans on Facebook to join them on Instagram. A possible move in reaction to Facebook’s declining reach issue.
Auto-enthusiast magazines are generating significant engagement for some of the brands, something brands should leverage when possible, as not all press will be entirely possible.

Brands analyzed are: Acura, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Infiniti, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volvo.

Selling Your Personal Data: Is It Worth It?

Posted by Neal Leavitt on July 20th, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Last year a student at New York University threw out an interesting challenge – via a Kickstarter campaign, he offered to divulge 60 days worth of private data gleaned from his digital devices.
He raised $2,733 from 213 backers.
And earlier this year, a research team at the University of Trento in Italy reeled in 60 people and their smart phones to participate in an experiment that recorded various personal details and created a marketplace to sell the data. These included phone calls, apps being used, time spent on them, photographs taken, and users’ locations 24/7.
Each week, as reported by MIT Technology Review, the participants took part in an auction to sell the data, e.g., they might want to sell a specific GPS location or total distance traveled, or locations visited on a given day.
While reporting all results could be the topic of another post, in brief, Jacopo Staiano, who headed up the research team, said there were a few key findings:
• Location is the most valued category of personally identifiable information;
• Participants valued their information more highly on days that were unusual compared to typical days;
• People who traveled more each day tended to value their personal information more highly.
Almost 600 ‘auctions’ were... Read more

10 Keys to Measurable Marketing Copy Success

Posted by Grant Johnson on July 9th, 2014 at 2:20 pm

Direct or measurable marketing is copy-driven. Way too many marketers change up a package or banner ad or landing page/website design first. Instead, they would be better served to tweak their copy. It will provide a bigger bang for the dollars spent, as these changes more often than not lead to sustainable ROI growth.
From my experience, here is a 10 item check list of questions to consider when you do your next copy rewrite:
1.)    Is Simpler better? Your copy should have 80% or more words that are five letters long or less. Smaller words make you, the marketer, appear smarter. If you have a complex product or service, you will be better served by simplifying your marketing prose.
2.) What grade-level should you write to? A 6th grade level seems to be the level from most campaigns I have done. This will force you to make your material easier to understand, but not so basic you offend people.
3.) How long should your sentences be? 15-20 words on average is optimal. However, I prefer to start with a quick 10 word or less sentence, focusing on a single benefit, whenever possible. One that captures the reader and makes them want to... Read more