'Ad Networks' Category

Changing your Company’s Name: How we used crowdsourcing to generate 1125 options

Posted by Chad Little on September 18th, 2014 at 10:08 am

Naming a startup is a difficult task. It’s made even more difficult by the fact that the majority of the great .com domains are gone. Choosing a good name that embodies what you do, creates a real identity and it’s easy to say and spell is a challenge.
I’ve faced this challenge several times with Sandbox.com (online fantasy sports), myGeek and then Fetchback.  We were especially proud of the brand we built at FetchBack. The name had meaning and a real identity. It was easy to build our marketing around and it attracted clients and employees that were like-minded. It was also a .com; a huge plus in a world where it becomes harder and harder to find a good domain.
adhesive.co
Our current startup is adhesive.co and it’s in the online ad-tech industry. We chose adhesive because easy to understand when spoken, has a positive meaning and ‘ad’ is a core part of the word (. We also liked the tie-in with 3M, a very innovative company.  That was the impetus anyways.
It’s hard to admit that the name you chose isn’t a good fit.
Unfortunately, adhesive.co lacks that soul and identity we’ve had in previous company names. It’s a ‘good’ domain but it’s... Read more

Will Infinite Scrolling and Lazy Loading Help Publishers?

Posted by Roy de Souza on September 18th, 2014 at 9:45 am

If there’s anything that can convince you that times are changing –again–in the online advertising business, it’s the relatively new practice of “lazy loading” pages. Unless you’re deep in the weeds of the business, you may not even know what this term means, but it is a new way to make pages load faster, and ironically may also be a way to make ads more visible.
In the old days of web design, the job of a good browser was to load an entire web page at one time, no matter how many outside calls and redirects the server has to make, as quickly as possible. Even if the user isn’t on that part of the page, the browser would load it anyway. That’s why everyone demanded to be above the fold.
But web design has changed. Now there’s just in time loading, or “lazy loading,”  a relatively new method of web design that renders the page on an as-needed basis,  only when a user is scrolling down to that piece of content.
Lazy loading pages are perfect for our InView Slider formats, which work especially well on web pages that are designed for infinite scrolling (which most new high traffic sites favor.)The content... Read more

Shining A Light On Beacon Misconceptions

Posted by Jeff Hasen on September 16th, 2014 at 9:42 am

Merriam-Webster describes a beacon as “a strong light that can be seen from far away and that is used to help guide ships, airplanes, etc.”
In 2014, it could revise the definition to include a piece of hardware used to guide marketers.
Last year it was showrooming at retail locations that was most watched in the holiday season. This year, many of these same brick-and-mortars, and many others, have something else to keep an eye on - beacons installed to execute personalized and contextually relevant mobile app experiences, and drive foot traffic, brand awareness, and incremental revenue.
I’ve learned a lot about beacons through a new relationship that I have with Mobiquity Networks, which has developed the leading shopping mall-based mobile advertising network.
One misconception around beacons is that mobile device owners will be pestered by so many offers that the permission that they granted to receive marketing messages will be rescinded. That surely won’t happen if brands establish business rules that address consumer wants and desires.
Just look at the messaging channel. Thousands of brands have successfully engaged with consumers through permission-based mobile VIP clubs in large part because they understand that messages should only be sent when they provide value to the recipient.
In... Read more

Selling Your Personal Data: Is It Worth It?

Posted by Neal Leavitt on July 20th, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Last year a student at New York University threw out an interesting challenge – via a Kickstarter campaign, he offered to divulge 60 days worth of private data gleaned from his digital devices.
He raised $2,733 from 213 backers.
And earlier this year, a research team at the University of Trento in Italy reeled in 60 people and their smart phones to participate in an experiment that recorded various personal details and created a marketplace to sell the data. These included phone calls, apps being used, time spent on them, photographs taken, and users’ locations 24/7.
Each week, as reported by MIT Technology Review, the participants took part in an auction to sell the data, e.g., they might want to sell a specific GPS location or total distance traveled, or locations visited on a given day.
While reporting all results could be the topic of another post, in brief, Jacopo Staiano, who headed up the research team, said there were a few key findings:
• Location is the most valued category of personally identifiable information;
• Participants valued their information more highly on days that were unusual compared to typical days;
• People who traveled more each day tended to value their personal information more highly.
Almost 600 ‘auctions’ were... Read more

Help Advertisers Find Audiences with Viewable Impressions

Posted by Roy de Souza on July 8th, 2014 at 9:26 am

Advertising has always been a cyclical and tenuous business. The venerable department store magnate John Wanamaker, whom no one even remembers any longer, once said “I know half my advertising is wasted; I just don’t know which half.”  If there’s a blip in the market, advertising is always the first thing to go, and that’s why Madison Avenue is so competitive and littered with Type-A corpses.
What is different now from in Wanamaker’s time is the number of businesses  based on advertising as a business model, as though it can support an infinite number of publishers. Even Google had to diversify. They can’t ALL continue to exist. Before  the internet, we had far fewer publishers than we have now. Some just had to go. Like job opportunities in a downturn, advertising never goes away entirely, but it does shrink.
Advertisers are now choosing among a larger group of publishers, some of whom represent completely new concepts of content and new demographics. So what happens? If you’re a legacy publisher with advertising as a business model, one thing you can do is lower your rates, cut your burn.  Even the New York Times has had to do all this and more.   But there’s something else you can do: you can help advertisers find their... Read more