Archive for Roy de Souza

Will Facebook Beat Google for Ad Dollars?

Posted by Roy de Souza on October 9th, 2014 at 2:11 pm

Once Facebook realized that it was a large publisher of user-generated content rather than merely a directory for college students, it set about figuring out how to win on all sides of the advertising business rather than be content merely to sell ads on its own  site. In the past several months, with the release of both Audience Network, its mobile ad network, and Atlas, it's targeting platform, Facebook is demonstrating how serious it is about winning at the advertising game. Facebook ads, which used to be quite affordable, have risen 123% in price this year.
While few will remember the short-lived Beacon ads that infuriated users in the early days, no one can escape the current presence of ads in the newsfeed (although astute users are able to tell the social network which ads they don't want to see). But the company is well aware that too many ads in a user's feed will make the service less valuable users rather than more. So how to maximize advertising revenues without angering your users?  One way is to raise your ad prices, as the site has already done. But another way is to roll out a mobile ad network, targeting app downloads... Read more

Will Infinite Scrolling and Lazy Loading Help Publishers?

Posted by Roy de Souza on September 18th, 2014 at 9:45 am

If there’s anything that can convince you that times are changing –again–in the online advertising business, it’s the relatively new practice of “lazy loading” pages. Unless you’re deep in the weeds of the business, you may not even know what this term means, but it is a new way to make pages load faster, and ironically may also be a way to make ads more visible.
In the old days of web design, the job of a good browser was to load an entire web page at one time, no matter how many outside calls and redirects the server has to make, as quickly as possible. Even if the user isn’t on that part of the page, the browser would load it anyway. That’s why everyone demanded to be above the fold.
But web design has changed. Now there’s just in time loading, or “lazy loading,”  a relatively new method of web design that renders the page on an as-needed basis,  only when a user is scrolling down to that piece of content.
Lazy loading pages are perfect for our InView Slider formats, which work especially well on web pages that are designed for infinite scrolling (which most new high traffic sites favor.)The content... Read more

Help Advertisers Find Audiences with Viewable Impressions

Posted by Roy de Souza on July 8th, 2014 at 9:26 am

Advertising has always been a cyclical and tenuous business. The venerable department store magnate John Wanamaker, whom no one even remembers any longer, once said “I know half my advertising is wasted; I just don’t know which half.”  If there’s a blip in the market, advertising is always the first thing to go, and that’s why Madison Avenue is so competitive and littered with Type-A corpses.
What is different now from in Wanamaker’s time is the number of businesses  based on advertising as a business model, as though it can support an infinite number of publishers. Even Google had to diversify. They can’t ALL continue to exist. Before  the internet, we had far fewer publishers than we have now. Some just had to go. Like job opportunities in a downturn, advertising never goes away entirely, but it does shrink.
Advertisers are now choosing among a larger group of publishers, some of whom represent completely new concepts of content and new demographics. So what happens? If you’re a legacy publisher with advertising as a business model, one thing you can do is lower your rates, cut your burn.  Even the New York Times has had to do all this and more.   But there’s something else you can do: you can help advertisers find their... Read more

Should You Outsource Your Ad Ops?

Posted by Roy de Souza on June 16th, 2014 at 8:08 am

Advertising Operations (aka Ad Ops) is critical to both the buy- and sell-side of digital media. A well-oiled Ad Ops team with technical expertise and the ability to turn  campaigns around quickly helps an organization run seamless operations and in turn achieve revenue goals.
Over the years, Ad Operations has evolved from being a highly technical task to a more process-driven activity requiring diligence and meticulousness as its most important skills. This of course has been driven by the simplified UI’s and workflows of most of the Ad Servers used today (barring a few, I should say).
Managing an Ad Ops team however, presents its  own challenges. From ever-increasing costs to employee retention, many issues grab the time and attention of upper management. Some of these challenges though can be mitigated by outsourcing your Ad Operations activities.
Although there are many advantages to outsourcing Ad Ops, there are a few important ones. The most important of these is cost effectiveness; it’s usually less expensive to outsource. Based on the Ad Monsters Salary survey for 2013, an organization can save up to 50% in salaries when it outsources a regular Ad Trafficker position. Savings can be greater if you include the “burden” — almost a third more than the salary for benefits, management... Read more

What Do Publishers Think About Viewability?

Posted by Roy de Souza on June 9th, 2014 at 8:15 am

Welcome to the moving target that is viewability. Admonsters has done a survey of fifty ad operations departments at major publishers to find out how publishers felt about the lifting of the MRC stay. Agencies and  advertisers are now empowered to buy on viewability. This will not be an easy shift, as there are still inconsistencies in how viewability is measured. There are about a dozen certified  testing companies, from Comscore and Nielsen to startups, and they all measure with slightly different methodologies even if they are looking for the same standard.
Survey respondents and recent event attendees have told Admonsters that “a  publisher’s viewability isn’t a single number but varies by ad position and page type and then by how the user interacts with the page. This creates an extra level of complexity with inventory management and forecasting— critical functions that are already difficult for publishers to manage.”
Three of the major findings from the research are:

Viewability won’t be taking most publishers by surprise as they have been actively trying to understand the impact by testing multiple vendors and taking steps to improve viewability. 74% of publishers have completed testing for viewability on their sites. Only 15% hadn’t even begun to test, and most of these cited cost as the reason.
While publishers see the... Read more