Archive for Rick Mathieson

Farewell Q&A with New York Times Ad Columnist Stuart Elliott (Part 1): What I Saw at the Revolution

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 5th, 2015 at 1:08 pm

The advertising world released a collective gasp when news hit that Stuart Elliott - the longtime advertising columnist for the New York Times - was accepting a buy-out package and would retire.
After nearly 25 years of covering advertising for the Times, not to mention stints at USA Today and Ad Age before that, Stuart and his column had become must-read for puissant, timely insights on Mad Ave.
And what a quarter century it was. From the early 1990s to today, the ad industry went from analog everything to digital domination; from "Married with Children" to "Modern Family;" and from bigger-is-better, to small is the new black.
"Who could or would have thought in the early ’90s that 20-odd years later the hegemony of television, for decades the most powerful ad medium, would be under siege, or at least, in question" Stuart wrote in his final column December 18.
"Ratings data, the currency of television, is growing problematic because viewership is more difficult to measure when people use mobile devices instead of TV sets; or watch shows online, as streaming video or as video-on-demand. And it is easier than ever for viewers to ignore or avoid traditional commercials; popular streaming services like Netflix are... Read more

2015 Mobile Marketing Predictions – from 2005 (Pt 2): Mobile Advertising

Posted by Rick Mathieson on December 15th, 2014 at 9:32 am

As longtime readers of my books, blog and posts here in iMedia will tell you, I’m not exactly bullish on mobile advertising.
At least not in its current model, which mostly takes the conventions from another medium (ad banners on the old-school Internet) and plops them into our used-to-be-shrinking-now-ever-expanding mobile phone screens.
Let me explain.
In 2005, it was clear to me that mobile advertising would have to be a game changer. But not just because it’s mobile, or the fact that you can target based on things like location.
As I wrote back then in my first book, BRANDING UNBOUND, the web banner-based ad model for mobile was something that had to be tried, and continues onto this day – if not for anything else than it’s a familiar framework, and it’s easy for agency folks to explain to clients.
Indeed, most marketers still don’t have a clue about mobile marketing. Just think of how the industry (and financial markets) herald Facebook’s success in mobile advertising.
I find it intriguing.  I have yet to see a Facebook banner ad that a.) I’ve clicked on, and b.) is anything different than the way I’d experience that same ad on the old school Internet.
Just because an ad... Read more

2015 Mobile Marketing Predictions – from 2005 (Pt 1)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on December 5th, 2014 at 11:07 pm

Let’s just say I had a head start on my 2015 mobile marketing predictions.
In 2005, my first book, BRANDING UNBOUND, hit bookshelves proclaiming a new era for marketing – one where the most measurable, personal and direct link to consumers ever created would change the world of marketing forever.
Written in 2003 and 2004, and published in June of ’05, I prognosticated about Apple Pay, iPad, Google Glass, Nest – and trends like marketing personalization, mixed reality social apps, augmented reality and more.
The book came out in June 2005 - two full years before the first iPhone was launched and heralded seismic changes to our relationship with technology.
Advertising that anticipates what you want and offers it before you even think you want it.

Services that let you shop for pizza, music, books and movies – anywhere, anytime.

Offers sent to you in-store, based on your age, gender, location, stated preferences and past purchase history—and even what merchandise you’re holding in your hands,  in real time.

Mobile, social platforms that let you do everything from get your gossip on to facilitating real-world meet ups between “crushes” who happen to be within 10 blocks of each others' physical location.

Stores... Read more

A Restaurateur's Best Friend: Q&A with James McKinney, CEO of SimpleDeal (Pt 2)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 7th, 2014 at 2:25 pm

In part one of my interview with SimpleDeal CEO James McKinney, we heard about how this new app connects passersby with restaurants right at the point of maximum interest.

In part two, we'll hear more about what it means to restaurants - including how they might be able to turn a trove of data into a gold mine.
CLICK TO LISTEN: Q&A: James McKinney, CEO of SimpleDeal (Pt 2)
(Approx 7 min, 25 sec)

Q&A: James McKinney, CEO of Simple Deal – A New Twist on Mobile Deal Apps for Restaurants (Pt 1)

Posted by Rick Mathieson on February 5th, 2014 at 4:28 pm

I'm digging SimpleDeal, which looks to be a promising new hyper-local mobile app that connects restaurants with customers at the point of maximum interest.
Unlike apps for setting reservations, receiving daily deals, pre-ordering meals and so on, SimpleDeal acts like a kind of digital wingman, enabling passersby to point their mobile phones at a restaurant to see the menu, find out more about its offerings, review any special deals and make a dining decision.
The restaurant can then follow up with new deals if the consumer opts in, but the app capitalizes on what I believe is mobile's greatest promise.
That is to say it is not push-based, it is pull-based - consumer activated, at the consumer's discretion, at the moment when a consumer is most interested in what you have to offer. And it is enabled through an online portal where restaurants can modify their messaging, or change out specials or deals, in real time.
Most important of all, it gives the client restaurant more than just a transactional ROI, it gives them added voice and value, by enabling them to share what they believe makes their offerings unique.
Time will tell if SimpleDeal, which is live in Long Beach California today, and about... Read more