Archive for Michael Shehan

Dare to Be Surprised in Digital Video Advertising Trends for 2013

Posted by Michael Shehan on January 23rd, 2013 at 9:01 am

In the past year, we’ve seen the greater awareness (and, consequently, media spending) devoted to digital video, mobile, programmatic buying and selling of ad inventory, and social media take off in manners and volumes most of us wouldn’t have predicted. There’s no such thing as the status quo in rapidly growing technologies and media channels, and in 2013, records will be broken, and outmoded models will crumble. Here are 11 ways we predict the digital marketplace will really change in 2013.

Video RTB revenue will exceed Forrester expectations. Sure, we have an affinity to this, but Forrester has predicted RTB video spending will grow from $387 million in 2012 to $667 million in 2013. This might sound like huge growth, and it is, but it’s conservative given the conversation about programmatic buying and selling is picking up.  RTB is a big part of programmatic in video. If people were surprised by the statistics around the rise of online video consumption in 2012, 2013 will be even... Read more

The Future of Media Is Paid

Posted by Michael Shehan on November 26th, 2012 at 7:45 am

There’s no doubt that the media industry has seen dramatic change in the last 15 years. Readership of traditional newspapers has plummeted. Compounding the issue, the traditional newspaper model where classifieds and ads were sold based on circulation (regardless if someone actually read the paper and saw your ad) has been absolutely decimated as advertisers have moved their dollars to more effective, more addressable advertising options.
With the rise of many quality blogs, online publications, and digital video and social media, we continue to see this content shift online faster than ever before, and the old school newspaper monetization model doesn’t work online. For instance, even if a newspaper sold all of their banners at the highest possible CPMs, it would never make up for what they have lost from their traditional model, and therefore will never be able to support the glory days of newspapers. Say a newspaper could sell four banner ads on a page for $10 CPM each (and that’s being generous). For every 1,000 page views, they would make $40. Applying Denver Post’s comScore stats for last month where they generated 45,000,000 page views, they would make $1,800,000 per month. ... Read more