Archive for Jeff Hasen

Diluting and Confusing Is Hardly A Smart Holiday Marketing Strategy

Posted by Jeff Hasen on December 1st, 2014 at 7:08 pm

We’re the all-powerful marketing team and when we say that something is a deal, then it darn well is.
Unless it’s not.
The slow-pitch, knock-it-out-of-the-park prediction was that mobile would set sales records Black Friday (whenever that is – more on this is a second) and Cyber Monday. More have smartphones, brands have made mobile a focus, mobile web sites aren’t buffering like they did on BlackBerry devices in 2005, and we’re a society that craves convenience. Or is lazy.
Or both.
What seems to have caught many by surprise is that much like a giraffe is a giraffe even if we tell others that it’s a rhino, Black Friday is a day. Not a week. Not a month. Heck, someone might try to call all of 2015 Black Friday.
Except that it’s foolish to extend a dedicated shopping day to a longer period and then to whine about a dip in Black Friday sales. Ummm, you asked them to buy on what everyone else calls a Monday. They were done by Friday – or didn’t believe that the “deals” were few and fleeting.
We might look back and say that extending the “special days” to longer periods made sense because overall sales were up, but... Read more

Are You Successful If 5-7% of Your Customers Engage Through Mobile?

Posted by Jeff Hasen on November 16th, 2014 at 10:55 am

Google’s Jason Spero, up there with Mary Meeker as a “must-hear” speaker on mobile activity and where we are headed, recently chided the industry for focusing so much on app installs.
He also said that while a brand that sees 5-7% of its customers being reached by mobile is labeled a success, there is an opportunity for much more if marketers would give consumers more ways to “take action”.
“My fear is that we as an industry have over-indexed on app installs as the goal, when what we need to focus on is the mobile consumer who wants to solve real-world problems like booking a flight or buying makeup,” Spero, Google's VP of Performance Media, said in a keynote at the M1 Summit in San Francisco.
“There is so much revenue to be made for an app install, but it's a very small part of what is going on for consumers in mobile. It’s about recognizing that moment and recognizing what they want and need in that moment”.
Spero (@speroman) pointed to what he called ”fundamental consumer behavior changes”, adding that they are “planning, researching, buying and finding on mobile.
“Think about how you serve broader action on mobile.”
Meeker, a partner at venture capital firm... Read more

Disney Proves That The Naysayers Belong In Fantasyland

Posted by Jeff Hasen on October 6th, 2014 at 12:52 pm

The cynics said that we would protect our privacy at all costs.
The doubters waved their arms and said that there wasn’t anything to entice us in large numbers to join and see value in permission-based programs run by brands. We will be spammed, they foolishly predicted.
The doomsday gang said that we are all too busy to notice calls to action that ask us to do something.
Wrong.
Wrong.
And wrong.
In the most eye-opening permission-based wireless success to date, Disney World has enticed more than half of its 18.6 million annual park visitors to use its MagicBand wearable device and the accompanying app to, as Wired put it, “skip long lines, preorder food, and charge purchases to their Disney resort room. And it kind of feels … fun.”
http://www.wired.com/2014/09/design-package-2014/
Fun. And of value to the masses. Here today, not something that you can only find in Fantasyland.
“The things you want to do at the park all become the family's mission,” Tom Staggs, Disney's chair of parks and resorts, told Wired. “Being able to lock that mission in de-stresses your whole vacation.”
And there’s value all along the journey, making the Happiest Place on Earth even happier.
According to Wired, visitors use an app to pre-select three rides for... Read more

Shining A Light On Beacon Misconceptions

Posted by Jeff Hasen on September 16th, 2014 at 9:42 am

Merriam-Webster describes a beacon as “a strong light that can be seen from far away and that is used to help guide ships, airplanes, etc.”
In 2014, it could revise the definition to include a piece of hardware used to guide marketers.
Last year it was showrooming at retail locations that was most watched in the holiday season. This year, many of these same brick-and-mortars, and many others, have something else to keep an eye on - beacons installed to execute personalized and contextually relevant mobile app experiences, and drive foot traffic, brand awareness, and incremental revenue.
I’ve learned a lot about beacons through a new relationship that I have with Mobiquity Networks, which has developed the leading shopping mall-based mobile advertising network.
One misconception around beacons is that mobile device owners will be pestered by so many offers that the permission that they granted to receive marketing messages will be rescinded. That surely won’t happen if brands establish business rules that address consumer wants and desires.
Just look at the messaging channel. Thousands of brands have successfully engaged with consumers through permission-based mobile VIP clubs in large part because they understand that messages should only be sent when they provide value to the recipient.
In... Read more

"Father of Mobile" Predicts Three More Revolutions

Posted by Jeff Hasen on July 15th, 2014 at 5:59 pm

We stood in line to a get a picture with the gentleman who looks a bit like Kris Kringle. There was no sitting on his knee, but we fawned over the “toy” that he had with him – the world’s first cellphone that the “father of mobile” had invented.
Forty-one years after Martin Cooper changed everything with a device now warmly called “The Brick” – it was actually the relatively humongous Motorola DynaTAC – the 85-year-old came this week to the Mobile Marketing Association’s CEO/CMO Summit in Hilton Head, S.C. to give us a history lesson – and to tell us what is next.
In 1983, “The Brick” had just 20 minutes of battery life and with a weight of 2 ½ pounds, Cooper said that users couldn’t even hold it up for 20 minutes.
Still, “we jump-started a revolution. People are fundamentally, inherently mobile. It seems like no one is where they want to be. Back then, the phone company told us the only way to do it was to tie people to their desks through copper wire. We set people free.”
That freedom and the consumer behavior changes that have come with it had about 200 marketers, publishers and others spending three... Read more