Archive for Jane Turkewitz

Why Recruiters Can't Introduce You To Their LinkedIn Contacts

Posted by Jane Turkewitz on April 29th, 2014 at 9:47 am

Given that I've been in the recruiting and career development business since the late '90s, I have many connections on LinkedIn.  Some of these connections are with people I know quite well. But, with upwards of 1,000 people in my network, many are merely digital acquaintances, connected because of business synergies. Whether or not they are real or superficial allies is somewhat of a moot point, though, because if you ask me to introduce you to a connection, there’s an underlying hint that I’m representing you for a job opening that they might have and I’ve gotta say “no.” Here’s why:
I’m Not Representing You OR The Person You Want to Be Introduced To
Recruiters are not selling product to earn a living. We are selling companies, career opportunities and, to a large extent, people. If I attempt to introduce you to someone at Say Media and Say Media is not my client, that individual at Say Media is not going to be happy with me. They are going to think I’m soliciting business from them by dangling talent in their face.
There are many recruiters who actually do this to get business. They will take your resume, delete the name and contact... Read more

5 Ways to Negotiate Salary When the Base "Is What It Is"

Posted by Jane Turkewitz on April 21st, 2014 at 8:01 am

You're looking for a new opportunity. Of course you'd like a bump in salary, or at the very least, to be where you are now, or were in your last job (if recently laid off).  I get it. And, so should HR teams and hiring managers.
However, sometimes, budgets are fixed.  Companies often have strict guidelines in terms of base salary ranges that they can offer for particular positions. For example, a Director–level position might offer a range of $125K-$140K on the base, based on one’s experience. Well, what if you were most recently earning a $155K base and are excited about this new opportunity put forth, but do not want to take a cut in salary and $140K is the final offer?
Here are some suggestions on how you can negotiate a better overall package, either from a financial or lifestyle point of view.
Ask for a Sign-On Bonus
Sure, a sign on bonus gives you extra dough in your pocket for one year and one year only. BUT, assuming you kick ass your first year, you'll most likely get a raise in year two anyhow, and it does bring your overall package up. For the companies behind the offer, even a small... Read more

Top 10 Proofreading Tips

Posted by Jane Turkewitz on March 3rd, 2014 at 8:27 am

Typos.  They are like zits on a teenager. Completely inevitable and, when few and far between, not very noticeable.  But, when you send document after document, and email after email, filled with garbled vocabulary and missing words, it's like looking at a 15-year-old with a face full of pustules.
In this fast-paced, email-driven world, where multitasking is the norm, SLOWING DOWN is literally the "proactive solution" for typos.  If you want to make sure you are buttoned up in your written correspondence, here are some steps you can take to clean up your communications...
Read Text Out Loud Slowly
When you read out loud, you are forced to slow down. You hear and listen for sentence correctness. Read each word of each sentence ALOUD and very slowly so that you are reading in a monotone.  This will help to avoid reading what you THINK you wrote, vs. what you ACTUALLY wrote.

Read Your Text Backwards
When writing, we usually become blind to our own mistakes since the brain automatically corrects wrong words inside sentences.  In order to break this pattern, try reading your text backwards, word for word.  This will help you to check spelling and details, but not content.
Make Sure Your Numbers Are... Read more

Top 5 Things to Know About “Thank you” Letters

Posted by Jane Turkewitz on November 20th, 2013 at 7:20 am

The “thank you” letter. Sounds old school. But, when it comes to this topic, old school isn’t a  bad thing.
I have seen many candidates completely blow their chances of getting a job by not properly following up after an interview. A strong “thank you” note is incredibly powerful for 5 key reasons:

It Shows Off Your Follow Up Skills — This is of the utmost importance if you are applying for a sales position. The interviewer is going to assume that your follow up with her is a direct reflection of how you would follow up with a client.  Even if your specialty area does not include client-facing responsibilities, chances are you are interviewing for a position that will require you to manage projects, liaise with internal departments and/or oversee external vendors. In any one of these cases, strong organizational and communications skills are necessary and the “thank you” letter is basically a mirror into how you would perform these duties.
It Shows Off Your Listening Skills — An interview is a give and take session in which you learn about a company and a position and the hiring manager learns about your skills and how you can possibly make a positive... Read more

Why the Recruiting Process is Broken and How To Fix It

Posted by Jane Turkewitz on November 4th, 2013 at 4:06 am

Branding has shifted dramatically with the advent of Internet technologies and social media. Companies can’t simply create a logo, a catchy tag line and a single, unified message and call it a day.  Today’s brand marketers are challenged to truly connect with consumers in a more personal way.
Customer service has become a huge part of the branding experience as companies address public commentary that can have a negative impact by going viral, reaching thousands, if not millions via social channels. New data technologies allow companies to push out different brand messages to varying consumer sets, based on sex, demographics, online shopping behaviors and psychographics, at the micro- and macro-level with a few clicks of a mouse.
Chris Malone and Susan Fiske, in their book, The Human Brand: How We Relate to People, Products and Companies, profess that the brands with the greatest success today embrace two things to the fullest: warmth and competence. Humans are wired to migrate towards people who are warm and competent and thus it makes sense that brands capable of embracing these two traits will be inherently magnetic.
Reading this was an “aha moment” for me. Not only regarding the concept of branding, but in how it also... Read more