Creative Best Practices

Consumers put Kotex on the launch pad

Posted by Jodi Harris on April 7th, 2011 at 9:59 am

Gentlemen, if the above blog title didn't already scare you away, you may just want to keep scanning for a sports marketing post, or maybe something about GoDaddy.com's latest promotion. Just like that day in the 7th grade when the gym teacher took you all out of the room, this one's kinda just for the ladies...

Ok, now that we've lost the Y-chromosome contingent (those who stuck around: I applaud you), let's talk about period care; specifically the humble sanitary napkin. Decades old, and still generally the same. Sure, they've gotten smaller over the years. And self-adhesive. They work better than the ones your mom used to use. At some point in their evolution, they even grew wings. But these sterile, white cotton pads still just don't fly as something that women want to spend much time thinking about, let alone parading around.

But what young woman can resist a chance to drive a cultural movement, or start a whole new fashion trend?

Kimberly-Clark, owner of the Kotex brand, has enlisted the help of digital agency Organic to help break the cycle of shame surrounding this mainstay of feminine care. The company's new campaign and website, Ban the Bland, thrusts the humble sanitary napkin into the limelight, offering it up to a young female audience as artistic inspiration.

The effort aims to draw in women ages 12 to 24 to the site to create designs for a new, colorful product using its creative tools, graphics, and other assets. K-C is also sponsoring a contest as part of the promotion, with the most innovative concepts earning their artists a chance to work with legendary stylist Patricia Field and see their creations come to light.

From a consumer perspective, it's a refreshing effort that encourages young women to take ownership of their body cycles and how they prepare for them -- after all, just about everything else we keep in our purses is personalized.  And from a marketing perspective, it's an interesting example of how to engage the empowered, savvy and sassy female demographic of today.

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