Targeting

Seven days, three conferences, two panels, one keynote, and a name change!

Posted by Jeff Hirsch on March 3rd, 2009 at 12:00 am

Last week was a busy one for us! First, as you probably know, we officially announced the change of our company name from Revenue Science to AudienceScience. As the targeting industry has evolved over the years, so have we as a company. Today, we are a technology-centric media company focused on the science of online marketing. Our core value proposition is that, simply, we help marketers and publishers find and understand audiences. The name AudienceScience instantly conveys the essence of our mission.

 

There has been no change in management and we will be providing the same industry leading service upon which we have built our reputation. The name is new, and we will continue to offer our leading audience technology platform and targeting marketplace, recording billions of behavioral events daily and reaching over 385 million unique Internet users. As we look forward to a new era for the company, our focus remains on empowering Web publishers, marketers, networks, exchanges, and agencies to create intelligent audience segments to connect people with relevant advertising.

 

We made the formal announcement at the IAB Annual Meeting last Monday, and had a great time at the event. I was able to check out the New York Times new interactive capabilities and hear Omar Hamoui and Eric Bader talk mobile. Brands Battle Back and Great Debate panel were lively and informative. There was a lot of conversation about the need for BOTH art and science to get the internet to truly become the marketing vehicle it has the potential to be.  I must have heard the word “audience” 200 times during the two days, and each time I felt as though we were getting brand recognition around our new name!

 

From there, I headed back to NYC for OMMA Behavioral to deliver my keynote “2020 Vision, the Future of Behavioral Targeting.” I believe that in 2020, BT spend will exceed search spend because search is only one of many indicators of intent, whereas BT combines multiple indicators to find the most qualified audiences. On a broader level, Internet spend will exceed TV spend. This is already imminent with the proliferation of DVR and Internet TV, It makes sense--consumers are spending their time online, advertising dollars follow consumers. The drive for efficiency and performance will only accelerate this trend in the coming decade. These ideas were supported by what I heard on the show floor that ROS display ad budgets are shrinking but BT budgets are increasing. More and more agencies & advertisers are relying on BT and retargeting as key performers.

 

The recent FTC report on BT was brought up during every panel, which illustrates the desperate need for standards in the industry. Self-regulation requires its code of conduct, which the NAI has been working to solidify, but the questions still go beyond those recommendations. Data ownership, data retention, PII and Opt-Out standards are all issues that need a great deal of work and thought on the part of the industry. The Behavioral Targeting Standards Consortium (BTSC) is designed to address these issues, to get involved, visit www.btstandards.org. I also recommend that everyone get involved with the NAI and IAB respectively.  We are all in this together so the more we develop standards and self regulation, the stronger our industry will be. 

Leave a comment